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Source:  The Texas Observer

“To be part of this land,” rancher Pilar Pedersen says early on in “Trans Pecos: The Story of Stolen Land and the Loss of America’s Last Frontier,” “it’s just ephemeral.  Nobody owns this land.”

Living in West Texas’ Big Bend country makes Pedersen who she is, and the desert’s power humbles her.  While she believes “there is such a thing as stewardship,” the land is wild, meant to run itself.  “That’s why,” she explains, “when something like the pipeline comes along, you stand.”

Pedersen is one of several activists featured in “Trans Pecos.”  The activists, mostly volunteers with the Big Bend Conservation Alliance, make up one wing of the opposition to the Trans-Pecos Pipeline in West Texas.

Energy Transfer Partners started construction on the natural gas pipeline in 2015 and unleashed a wave of resistance in the area over the next two years.  Protesters were unable to stop the 148-mile pipeline, which was completed in 2017 and runs from Fort Stockton to Presidio.

The film’s director, longtime nature photographer Nicol Ragland, tells a tale of loss and unease as the pipeline tramples on land rights through eminent domain and endangers West Texas residents.

Read the story at The Texas Observer.


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