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Source:  Village Voice

The best way to experience Tim Wardle’s documentary, “Three Identical Strangers,” is to do so without knowing a single thing about it.

So before proceeding any further, let’s just get this out of the way: It’s an excellent movie, and you should see it.

For those still here, I’ll try to steer clear of the film’s most shocking revelations. But there’s no getting around the central premise, which itself is fun to discover.

The movie opens in 1980, with 19-year-old Robert Shafran of Westchester County, New York arriving at Sullivan County Community College in the Catskills. It’s his first day at that school, and yet everybody on campus appears to know him and call him “Eddy.”

A fellow student, starting to realize what’s going on, grabs Robert and drives him to the Long Island home of 19-year-old Eddy Galland — and Robert comes face to face with himself. Or rather, his exact doppelganger. Eddy and Robert, it turns out, are identical twins, separated at birth, now brought together by an amazing coincidence.

So, they get newspaper stories written about their startling reunion whereupon a third person shows up: David Kellman of New York City. Now there are three identical young men — triplets.

Each of them was apparently sent to a different home by the same adoption agency, without any information given to their new families about the existence of the others.

From there the story goes absolutely bonkers, taking twists that send things spinning not just in another direction, but practically into another dimension — one far more paranoid and tragic.

Read the story at the Village Voice.

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