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Source:  The New York Times

Steven Soderbergh, after shooting his 2018 feature “Unsane” with an iPhone, declared smartphone cinema to be the future.

Yet the technology is also a window on the recent past, as shown in the largely unknown masterpiece, “The Uprising,” a 2014 film by journalist and documentary filmmaker Peter Snowdon.

Snowdon’s film is composed entirely of material found on YouTube.  It’s an anthology of vernacular videos (to use Snowdon’s phrase) made nine years ago in Tunisia, Bahrain, Syria, Libya, Yemen, and Egypt during the Arab Spring.

Working with filmmaker Bruno Tracq, as well as a small army of translators, Snowdon has taken about 100 videos and distilled the Arab Spring into a weeklong imagined revolution.

“The Uprising” jumps from country to country, tracking a revolt from the initial rallies through violent confrontations with the police, the euphoria inspired by the fall of an autocratic regime, to the army’s attempt to restore order and the seizure of power.

Read the story at The New York Times.


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