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Source:  The Atlantic

Some films don’t need words.  “El Desierto” is one of them.

Carly and Jared Jakins’s short documentary follows a lone migrant worker as he shepherds thousands of sheep in the Great Basin desert amid a formidable drought.

Without a single line of dialogue, the film’s imagery speaks volumes about the isolating plight of America’s migrant workers and the looming specter of climate change.

The co-directors, who are married, grew up in the Great Basin, an arid expanse of nearly 190,000 square miles in the western United States.  Despite the fact that they were both raised in a wool-growing community, it wasn’t until adulthood that they became aware of the crucial role migrant workers play in the sheep-farming industry.

For 11 days, the filmmakers tracked Francisco Llerena, his flock, and his beloved sheepdogs as they navigated the mountains and high desert.  Their simple approach lends the film a lyrical and intimate quality.

Watch “El Desierto” above and read the story at The Atlantic.


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