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Source:  IndieWire

As the trauma of the 2016 presidential election gave way to self reflection, Cambridge Analytica epitomized a unique form of 21st-century villainy.

The British technology firm’s covert use of Facebook user data to map voter behavior boosted the Trump presidential campaign and “Yes on Brexit” vote by sowing disinformation, and it only faced comeuppance once a few employees decided to speak out.

Co-founded by former White House senior advisor Steve Bannon and tied to broader concerns about Facebook’s loose privacy standards, the company’s impact says much about the divisiveness of the last two years.

Cambridge Analytica’s exploitative online behavior became public in piecemeal, culminating with the company’s decision to shut down in early 2018. As a result, the full scope of its impact has been elusive.

Netflix production “The Great Hack,” a sprawling 137-minute documentary from the directors of “Startup.com” and “Control Room,” goes to great lengths to understand it.

The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

“The Great Hack” will premiere on Netflix later this year.

Read the story at IndieWire.

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