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Source:  The Atlantic

On television, when a perpetrator leaves a gun at the scene, a quick computer search can point law enforcement to the weapon’s owner.  In reality—at least in the United States—no such database of firearms exists.

To have one would be illegal, according to legislation that passed in Congress in 1986, lobbied for by the National Rifle Association.

Instead, we have the National Tracing Center, in Martinsburg, West Virginia. There, a nonsearchable index of paperwork related to gun purchases is housed in hundreds of shipping containers and file boxes.

The small federal agency operates with technology so antiquated that it precludes the use of an Excel spreadsheet.  It’s the only facility in the country that tracks firearms from a manufacturer to a purchaser.

Watch David Freid’s “Guns Found Here” above and read the story at The Atlantic.

 

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