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Source:  SF Gate

Richard Hambleton’s death on Oct. 29 caused barely a ripple on the arts scene. Few newspapers and websites — the New York Times was one of the few papers to run an obit — mentioned his passing.

And yet in the early 1980s, Hambleton, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring ruled the contemporary art scene, moving in celebrity circles, the subjects of exhibitions that were red-carpet media sensations, and selling their works for exorbitant amounts.

As Hambleton says in Oren Jacoby’s documentary “Shadowman,” in an interview from 2014: “At least Basquiat, you know, died,” he says. “I was alive when I died, you know. That’s the problem.”

Indeed, while Basquiat died of a drug overdose at age 27 in 1988 and Haring died at 31 of AIDS in 1990, Hambleton dropped off the map, descending into years of drug addiction and sometimes homelessness, and was generally forgotten until an exhibition backed by Giorgio Armani rocked the art world again in 2009.

Read the story at SF Gate.

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