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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  The Austin Chronicle

How much flirting does it take to unlock a lonely man’s wallet?

Spoiler alert: For the Ghanaian scam artists in “Sakawa,” the answer is “roughly seven days’ worth.”

Much of “Sakawa” takes place inside a cramped house where a dozen Ghanaian men sit on couches, tapping away at their keyboards to build relationships with “clients” on dating sites.

The scammers pose as women, augmenting their voices with special cell phones or simply by speaking in a higher pitch.

Female scammers “use what they have to get what they want.” (For better or worse, the gritty, long-distance sex acts described never appear on screen.)

It’s lucrative: The first ask is usually for $50, but the sky is the limit once a client is hooked.

Read the story at The Austin Chronicle.

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