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Source:  The Guardian

Reserve, Louisiana sits in the heart of an industrial corridor between New Orleans and Baton Rouge.  For more than 30 years, it’s been known to its residents as “Cancer Alley.”

That designation stems from the toxic pollution that is spewed out from chemical plants along the lower Mississippi River.

For a long time, proof of that morbid title lay mostly in anecdote and suspicion.  “We always wondered about the pollution, but we never really knew,” says Mary Hampton, who, like many residents in the region, relied on petrochemical plants to make a living for much of her career.

But the town underwent a profound awakening in December 2015 as the result of an Environmental Protection Agency report on toxic air.

The findings from the EPA, not only confirmed the existence of a profoundly higher risk of cancer throughout the region, but pinpointed Reserve, a working-class town of about 10,000 people, at its epicenter.

Watch short documentary “Cancer Town” above and read the story at The Guardian.

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