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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  Prevention

1.  Forks Over Knives (2011) – “Forks Over Knives” sets out to convince viewers to adopt a plant-based diet, and not necessarily for ethical reasons but rather for health. The documentary focuses on research that indicates that a number of chronic illnesses like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes can be prevented and improved by eliminating animal products from our diets.


2.  Icarus (2017) – Director Bryan Fogel embarked on this Academy Award-winning documentary with a simple premise – he would take performance-enhancing drugs and then compete in a renowned amateur cycling race, with the goal of proving how easy it is to get away with doping in the cycling world. But the end result proved much bigger than anticipated as Fogel and Russian scientist Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov ended up blowing the whole lid off the state-sponsored Olympic doping scandal in Russia.


3.  The Truth About Alcohol (2016) – When the UK introduced new guidelines recommending less alcohol consumption for men (lowering it to six pints of beer a week, the same as recommended for women), British ER doctor Javid Abdelmoneim set out to find—you guessed it—the truth about alcohol. In this funny yet informative documentary, he questions what prompted the change in guidelines, what the health risks (and possible benefits) of drinking are, why some folks get drunker faster, and more.


4.  My Beautiful, Broken Brain (2014) – After 34-year-old Lotje Sodderland suffers a hemorrhagic stroke and undergoes emergency brain surgery, she is lucky to be alive. However, she suffers from aphasia, a language impairment that affects one’s ability to speak, read, and write. Almost immediately, Sodderland begins filming herself to document her journey—not quite to recovery, but to learning how to live with her new normal.



5.  Unrest (2017) – This Sundance award-winning documentary shines a spotlight on chronic fatigue syndrome, a widely misunderstood disorder that causes extreme fatigue not related to any underlying medical condition. The film follows Jennifer Brea, a 28-year-old Harvard doctoral candidate who is left bedridden following a mysterious fever. When doctors tell her it’s all in her head, Brea and her husband decide to film her struggles with CFS as she connects with fellow sufferers around the world—all without leaving her bed.


See numbers 6 to 10 at Prevention.

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