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Source:  AP

Anthony Terrell believes an imprisoned man currently serving two life sentences may not have been the person who murdered his brother as part of a killing spree that rocked the city of Atlanta four decades ago.

With the HBO documentary “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children,” Terrell hopes new light can be shed on the murders that terrorized the African American community in the city within a two-year time span between 1979 and 1981.

The five-part series explores how the victims’ family members and others remain skeptical about Wayne Williams being the sole killer, despite evidence linking him to those murders and 10 others.

“I really want them to find out who did it,” said Terrell, whose 12-year-old brother, Earl, was one of the 29 abducted and killed between 1979 and 1981.  “It’s more than just blaming Wayne Williams.  His name was embedded in everybody’s heads.  Let us be focused on something else.  He was convicted of two adults, but the rest were children. What about them?”

Part one of “Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children” is available now on HBO.

Read the story at AP.


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