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Source:  The Daily Beast

Beauty and tragedy are intertwined in “Our Planet,” never more so than during its second episode, “Frozen Worlds,” in which thousands of walruses take up residence on Russia’s northeastern coastal beaches due to the fact that their natural habitat, the frozen sea ice, has contracted.

Crowded to the point of instigating hostile stampedes, some walruses take to the surrounding cliffs for refuge—an unwise decision, given that the flippered marine mammals are not fit for such rocky landscapes.  Before long, one slips and falls to its death, followed by another, and another, until they’re cascading down by the hundreds.

It’s a horrifying calamity born from climate change, and it epitomizes “Our Planet’s” marriage of celebration and lamentation.

Debuting today on Netflix, the eight-episode documentary series was produced by the award-winning team responsible for the BBC’s “Planet Earth” and “Blue Planet” series.

Like those acclaimed predecessors, it offers visions of the natural world, narrated by the legendary David Attenborough, that are sure to take your breath away—don’t be surprised if, after fifteen minutes, you’re already dreaming of purchasing a new 4K TV.

Yet while “Our Planet” looks and sounds familiar, there’s something different about its sterling portraits: a deeply-ingrained sorrow for a world struggling to cope with the ramifications of climate change.

“Our Planet” is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at The Daily Beast.

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