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Source:  The Daily Beast

Television is littered with travel shows about the many luxurious and cozy corners of the globe, but what it’s so far lacked is a program that transports viewers to the most dangerous, off-limits, and inappropriate sites and scenes the world has to offer an intrepid vacationer.

Enter “Dark Tourist,” an eight-part series now available on Netflix that celebrates the craziest hot spots accessible via a passport and a tank of gas—or, in some cases, the forbidden locales guarded by humorless military police.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to take a jaunt to a nuclear fallout zone, experience a voodoo initiation ceremony, snoop around Jeffrey Dahmer’s old stomping grounds, or hang out with Pablo Escobar’s top assassin and Charles Manson’s best friend, this is definitely the bonkers bingeable entertainment for you.

“Dark Tourist” is the brainchild of journalist and documentarian David Farrier, the New Zealander responsible for 2016’s “Tickled”—an eye-opening non-fiction feature about the secretive world of “competitive endurance tickling,” which is as insane as it sounds.

For his latest, Farrier seeks out similarly wacko points of interest, although in this case, those are geographic in nature. With each episode featuring three or four different route stops, all of them located on a particular continent, Farrier’s show fixates on areas defined by death and destruction.

It’s an attempt for him to enter the places one is supposed (or outright told) to avoid—and, in the process, to provide us with the vicarious thrill of checking them out from the comfort and safety of our own homes.

Read the story at The Daily Beast.

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