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Source: Los Angeles Times.

Just one week ago, President Trump declared he would pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord — an agreement signed by 195 nations devoted to curbing greenhouse gas emissions.

The move was blasted by everyone from Disney Chief Executive Robert Iger to former Vice President Al Gore, with critics arguing the withdrawal will only accelerate global warming.

In the wake of the president’s decision, a new documentary about how the Earth’s rising temperature is affecting coral reefs feels more timely than ever. The film, “Chasing Coral,” which will launch on Netflix on July 14, debuted its first trailer yesterday to coincide with World Oceans Day.

The movie was directed by Jeff Orlowski, the filmmaker behind 2012’s “Chasing Ice,” which documented how quickly the world’s glaciers are melting. His new film follows a team of divers from Hawaii to Australia as they set up underwater cameras to capture the bleaching of coral reefs in real time.

The movie — which premiered and was subsequently acquired by Netflix at the Sundance Film Festival in January — focuses heavily on the damage being done to the Great Barrier Reef. Just this month, a new report published in the journal Nature said that two-thirds of the northern section of the reef had perished over the past 18 months

 

As the film explains, bright, fluorescent-colored coral often shown in beautiful underwater photography is actually the first sign that a coral reef is getting too hot. Quickly after the vivid colors emerge, the stressed coral turns bright white and can no longer sustain life.

“Our oceans are dramatically changing and we are losing coral reefs on a global scale,” Orlowski said in an email to the Los Angeles Times this week. “We spent three years with divers, underwater photographers, and experts to reveal the majesty of our oceans, and the rapidly changing reality of our world. What we witnessed while making this film reshaped my understanding of the world.”

“Chasing Coral” is just one of the films about the state of our planet that’s set to for release this year. A couple of weeks after the movie hits Netflix, Gore’s climate change documentary “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” will hit theaters. And in September, “Trophy,” a nonfiction film about hunters who kill exotic animals for sport, will premiere.