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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  The New York Times

At a time when millions of species are at risk of extinction and deep-pocketed streaming services are spending billions on content, an old television genre, the nature show, is booming.

The latest big-budget nature documentary series from BBC Studios, “Seven Worlds, One Planet,” will make its debut tonight in the United States across various AMC cable networks such as BBC America and SundanceTV.  The first installment of the series, which is a follow-up to the recent ratings hits “Planet Earth II” and “Blue Planet II,” will focus on Australia.

There has never been more to watch for fans of the genre.  Netflix, Disney, and Apple are investing heavily in wildlife programming as part of their efforts to lure subscribers to their streaming services.

And nature shows are thriving on cable and public broadcast networks, with roughly 130 original nature series airing in 2019, more than the previous three years combined, according to Nielsen.

Read the story at The New York Times.


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