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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and International   |   Industry

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

“We’re in beautiful downtown Mossville,” says Stacey Ryan, the central figure in the documentary “Mossville: When Great Trees Fall,” as he waves his arm toward the supremely ugly petrochemical plants and construction projects surrounding him.  “Population of one,” he adds bitterly, essentially summing up the central theme of Alex Glustrom’s powerful film concerning the environmental ravaging of a once-thriving community.

Ryan is the last man standing in a rural town that at one point had a population of 8,000.  Founded in the late 19th century by freed slaves, Mossville, Louisiana, is where his family has lived for generations.

Once filled with natural beauty, the town was essentially taken over by Sasol, or South African Synthetic Oil Limited, an energy and chemical company that wanted to expand to America.

The company was welcomed with open arms by then-Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, seen in a news clip extolling the jobs and prosperity that the company would bring to the state.

Unfortunately, it came with a cost.  Sasol built 14 plants in the community, and the resulting chemical spills, fires, and general contamination eventually drove out all of the residents – except for Ryan.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.


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