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Source:  The Atlantic

“It is a paradise that has been set ablaze.”

That is how Masood Hussain, a renowned Kashmiri artist, describes his homeland.  The transmogrification is reflected in his paintings.

While Hussain once painted the idyllic rural landscapes of his childhood, his artwork now depicts the reality of Kashmir—a place of perpetual conflict, where normal life has been upended by death, forced disappearances, and the omnipresence of armed forces.

The decades-long struggle between India and separatist militants has transformed Kashmir into the most militarized region in the world.  Gone are the flowing rivers and Himalayan mountains of Hussain’s early art; a recent piece portrays a child with no eyes, invoking the victims of the Indian army’s pellet-gun attacks last year.

Hussain is one of four artists profiled in Niyantha Shekar and Mukti Krishan’s short documentary, “Art in the Time of Conflict.”

The film also introduces Hina Arif, Zeeshan Jaipuri, and Mujtaba Rizvi—young Kashmiri creatives whose artistic development was deeply influenced by the trauma of growing up in a war zone.

Through their stories and art, they convey the human cost of the enduring conflict.

Watch “Art in the Time of Conflict” above and read the story at The Atlantic.


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