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Source:  Boing Boing

Life on Mars has always been a standard science fiction topic, but season 2 of National Geographic’s “Mars,” which premiered Monday shows how real and attainable that focus has become.

The first season of the docudrama series aired in 2016 and was notable for its blending of fiction and science-based documentary, a format the show has maintained and improved upon.

Season 2 picks up several years into the development of Olympus Town, a colony of astronauts working with the International Mars Science Foundation. Close quarters living and the extreme environment take clear tolls on characters and their relationships, especially as love interests are established and a number of astronauts fall victim to the perils of space.

But for a show titled “Mars,” a significant amount of the footage is of tundras, deserts, and oceans on Earth, as well as on people who are not astronauts, but who are currently working to one day put men and women on our neighboring planet like Elon Musk, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and Bill Nye.

The choice to merge documentary and drama pioneered in “Mars” season 1 continues, polished, in season 2.

Read the story at Boing Boing.

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