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Source:  AP

To escape the poverty of south Texas migrant camps, Homer Garza joined the U.S. Army.  Months later he and his company found themselves surrounded in South Korea by an invading North Korean force.

Garza’s story is one of many shared in the PBS documentary “KOREA: The Never-Ending War.”  The film examines the lasting social and political costs of the Korean War — a conflict largely forgotten in the U.S.

It also tells the story of a war that redefined the region from the perspective of families, veterans, and journalists.

Filmmaker John Maggio said he wanted to create something that wasn’t focused on solely on views of ambassadors and historians, but real people affected by the war.

In addition, Maggio wanted his project to explain why tensions between North and South Korea remain nearly 70 years after a series of diplomatic blunders and violent massacres.

“KOREA: The Never-Ending War” premieres tonight on most PBS stations.

Read the story at AP.

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