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Source:  Los Angeles Times

Shraysi Tandon’s sobering debut documentary, “Invisible Hands,” takes a no-nonsense approach to exploring child labor and trafficking practices throughout the world.

There’s no way to depict these subjects on film that are not horribly heartbreaking, and while Tandon doesn’t sugarcoat them, neither does she delve too far into exploitative imagery.

After a searing opening sequence featuring a rescue raid in India, Tandon turns the film’s focus toward the real culprits: corporations that sell products derived from child labor.

“Invisible Hands” crosses the globe to show the dangerous and deplorable conditions in which children work, from palm fields in Indonesia, to cacao farms and mica mines in Ghana, to even in the United States, where children as young as 12 labor in tobacco fields, exposing them to high levels of nicotine and harsh chemical pesticides.

Protective gear? That would require admitting that children are working in these industries.

Read the story at the Los Angeles Times.

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