Your Source for Documentary News

Your Source for Documentary News

Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  The New York Times

“A German Life” is likely to be the last new movie of its kind: a documentary that presents contemporary testimony from someone who witnessed the inner workings of the Nazi high command.

The movie is taken from 30 hours of interviews with Brunhilde Pomsel who served as a secretary to Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels and was 103 when the film was shot. She died in January at 106.

Like “Blind Spot: Hitler’s Secretary,” which centered on the recollections of Traudl Junge, “A German Life” lets viewers consider its subject — her anecdotes, body language and face (often shot in close-up) — and decide how much to believe her.

The words of Ms. Pomsel, who is remarkably lucid for a centenarian, are intercut with quotations from Goebbels and archival footage from both sides of the war. Viewers are implicitly invited to ponder the contrast.

Read the story at The New York Times.

Receive all of the day’s stories in one email every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.

 

Pin It on Pinterest