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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  TIME

Just outside a Hong Kong subway station, dozens are gathered around a projector screen, transfixed.  They watch footage of riot police advancing towards protestors.  After 16 weeks of protests, many in the audience know this type of scene well.

They are gathered — along with people at about a dozen street corners, parks and other public spaces across Hong Kong — for screenings of “Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom,” an Oscar-nominated documentary about Ukraine’s anti-government protests of 2013.

The three-month-long protest, centered on a square in the capital Kyiv, successfully toppled the country’s pro-Russia leadership.

Hong Kong residents are drawing parallels between the Euromaidan movement, as Ukraine’s uprising was called, and their own struggle for democracy.  Both were sparked by a single controversy — in Hong Kong, from a now withdrawn extradition bill; in Ukraine, from the president’s refusal to sign an association agreement with the European Union.

But each quickly snowballed to include much broader demands for greater political freedom.

Read the story at TIME.


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