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Source:  Hyperallergic

Nicole Eisenman’s Bosch-flavored sculptures on the terrace may be the most Instagrammed works at the Whitney Museum’s biennial, but the most buzzed-about project is undoubtedly “Triple-Chaser.”

With computer programming and more traditional documentary techniques, the 11-minute film by Forensic Architecture — an independent research collaborative based at Goldsmiths, University of London — outlines in unsparing detail the harm done by tear gas and bullets manufactured by companies backed by Whitney board member Warren Kanders.

Migrants choke on the U..S-Mexico border.  A man’s leg is blown open in Gaza.  The phrase “possibly aiding and abetting war crimes” is uttered.

As major museums continue to evolve into aestheticized outgrowths of private and corporate capital, becoming as identified with the brands and individuals that support them as the works they house, what is happening at the Whitney is bound to repeat itself elsewhere.

Just this past week, one need only look at the Metropolitan Museum’s announcement to stop taking opiate-linked Sackler money for the time being.

Read the story at Hyperallergic.

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