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Source:  Film Journal International

Jane Goodall may seem like a well-chronicled woman—after all, she’s written more than a dozen books and been the subject of numerous films.

But documentary director Brett Morgen’s new National Geographic film “Jane” adds some surprising personal depth to Goodall’s incredible work with chimpanzees.

Opening in theaters on Oct. 20, the documentary tells Goodall’s story starting in 1960, when the 26-year-old Brit arrived in a remote area of northwestern Tanzania to study chimpanzees.

Lacking formal training, she initially struggles but eventually triumphs in the male-dominated field, challenging conventional research methods with her unique approach to wildlife observation.

At first glance, Morgen may seem like a surprising choice to direct a documentary about Goodall’s time in Gombe, where she did her seminal studies of primate behavior.

Past credits for Morgen include movie producer Robert Evans doc “The Kid Stays in the Picture” and “Crossfire Hurricane” about the Rolling Stones.

Read the story at Film Journal International.

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