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Source:  Rolling Stone

“I’m not an animal. I’m not crazy. I’m just a normal individual,” Ted Bundy says in a snippet of an interview at the beginning of the new Netflix documentary series, “Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes.”

Of course, as one of the most notorious serial killers in U.S. history, Bundy’s self-assessment is beyond suspect. But these sorts of statements make for fascinating television, even when it seems like every channel that used to survive off sappy movies or reality TV is now careening into a constant flow of true-crime.

“I trace this explosion that we currently live in, this insatiable appetite for [crime] programming, all the way back to the Big Bang of the Ted Bundy trial,” director Joe Berlinger tells Rolling Stone.

Berlinger, the filmmaker behind the four-part Netflix series, should know.

Best known for his films, “Brother’s Keeper” and the “Paradise Lost” documentary trilogy — which focused on wrongful convictions and the broken U.S. legal system — Berlinger also directed the buzzy forthcoming feature “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile,” which tells the story of Bundy through the eyes of his long-time girlfriend, Elizabeth Kloepfer.

Watch “Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes” on Netflix. 

Read the story at Rolling Stone.

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