Your Source for Documentary News

Your Source for Documentary News

Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  TheWrap

They aren’t sisters in a familial sense. But Ruth Elias, Ada Lichtman, Hanna Marton, and Paula Biren share a terrible kinship: They are the only people from their respective families to survive the Nazi Holocaust.

In “Shoah: Four Sisters,” the latest and last film from director Claude Lanzmann — the filmmaker behind the 1985 landmark documentary “Shoah,” who died earlier this year at 92 — they speak directly and steadily, explaining the various, harrowing routes taken to escape with their lives.

Presented in four discrete, non-chronological sections, “Four Sisters” begins with its longest interview, “The Hippocratic Oath,” in which Ruth Elias describes in exacting detail the many ways she narrowly evaded death, from hiding among girls she suspected would be spared for their looks, to removing her yellow star and posing as a non-Jewish Czech with no papers, to a horrifying encounter with Josef Mengele himself that left her newborn child dead.

Read the story at TheWrap. 

Receive all of the day’s documentary news every morning. Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.