Lebanon fears hunger, not coronavirus. Protesters return in rage

Lebanon fears hunger, not coronavirus. Protesters return in rage

Source:  The Guardian

Lebanon’s coronavirus lockdown has sent an economy already in deep trouble into freefall, and many are struggling to survive.

Gino Raidy is an activist who was prominent during the October 2019 anti-government corruption protests.

Now, with many fearing hunger and believing there is nothing left to lose, he’s helping to keep demonstrators safe as they demand real and lasting change.

Watch the video above and read the story at The Guardian.


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“The Uprising” is a masterpiece of iPhone cinema

“The Uprising” is a masterpiece of iPhone cinema

Source:  The New York Times

Steven Soderbergh, after shooting his 2018 feature “Unsane” with an iPhone, declared smartphone cinema to be the future.

Yet the technology is also a window on the recent past, as shown in the largely unknown masterpiece, “The Uprising,” a 2014 film by journalist and documentary filmmaker Peter Snowdon.

Snowdon’s film is composed entirely of material found on YouTube.  It’s an anthology of vernacular videos (to use Snowdon’s phrase) made nine years ago in Tunisia, Bahrain, Syria, Libya, Yemen, and Egypt during the Arab Spring.

Working with filmmaker Bruno Tracq, as well as a small army of translators, Snowdon has taken about 100 videos and distilled the Arab Spring into a weeklong imagined revolution.

“The Uprising” jumps from country to country, tracking a revolt from the initial rallies through violent confrontations with the police, the euphoria inspired by the fall of an autocratic regime, to the army’s attempt to restore order and the seizure of power.

Read the story at The New York Times.


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“Once Upon a Time in Venezuela” tells a tale of corruption, pollution, and rampant inflation

“Once Upon a Time in Venezuela” tells a tale of corruption, pollution, and rampant inflation

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

In Anabel Rodríguez Ríos’ immersive fly-on-the-wall documentary “Once Upon a Time in Venezuela,” one lakeside town serves as the embodiment of an entire nation racked by corruption, pollution, and rampant inflation as it slowly but surely drifts toward abandon.

Seven years in the making, the film is a testament to what happens when a chaotic and, many would say, illegitimate government wreaks havoc on its own populace, destroying lives and communities forged over several generations.

Indeed, the sad takeaway from this deep dive into Venezuelan affairs is that whether you’re on the left, the right, a purebred Chavista or a diehard anti-socialist, you may find yourself powerless against the colluding forces of nature and man.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.


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National Geographic Documentary Films acquires “Saudi Runaway”

National Geographic Documentary Films acquires “Saudi Runaway”

Source:  Variety

National Geographic Documentary Films has acquired “Saudi Runaway” which follows a young woman in Saudi Arabia attempting to flee the country before her arranged marriage.

The announcement was made last Tuesday prior to the film’s screening at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Muna, the young Saudi woman, used her cell phone to secretly document her claustrophobic existence and her flight to freedom.

Working in close collaboration with the film’s director, Susanne Regina Meures (whom Muna spoke with multiple times a day for months), the result is a view inside Saudi Arabia’s patriarchal culture.

Read the story at Variety.


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“7 Murders a Day” explores cartel violence in Tijuana

“7 Murders a Day” explores cartel violence in Tijuana

Source:  KTSM

Charlie Minn’s latest documentary, “7 Murders a Day,” explores the ongoing issue of cartel violence in Tijuana, Mexico, which became the murder capital of the world in 2018.

In the film, Minn and his crew ride along with the Tijuana Police to find out how the city became so dangerous.

Nearly ten years ago, Minn released “8 Murders a Day,” which explored cartel violence in Juarez, Mexico.

Minn said his experience in Juarez prepared him for his latest film, and he sees many similarities between the two Mexican cities.

Find out more about “7 Murders a Day” at the film’s website.

Read the story at KTSM.


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Teranga is the afrobeats nightclub uniting Italy

Teranga is the afrobeats nightclub uniting Italy

Source:  The Guardian

Fata and Yankuba are two young men from Gambia with ambitious dreams, who fled dictatorship and poverty and landed in Naples, Italy, only to discover a new kind of violence: a pernicious climate of racism and an unhelpful immigration system.

Their only escape from the psychological torture of years spent waiting for immigration documents in squalid camps is a small underground club in the heart of the city.

The Teranga nightclub provides a rare safe space for migrants to meet young Italians while dancing and singing away the collective trauma of their journeys to Europe and the discrimination they face in Italy

Watch “Teranga” above and read the story at The Guardian.


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