A Ted Bundy true crime docuseries is coming to Netflix

A Ted Bundy true crime docuseries is coming to Netflix

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

Netflix is adding another true crime docuseries to its roster, this time focusing on notorious serial killer Ted Bundy.

The streaming service, home to “Making a Murderer,” “The Keepers,” and numerous other crime docuseries, will premiere “Conversations With a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes” on Jan. 24.

The date is exactly 30 years after Bundy was executed for the 1978 murder of Kimberly Leach.

“Conversations With a Killer,” from Emmy winner Joe Berlinger (“Paradise Lost”), will feature previously unheard audio of interviews with Bundy while he was on death row in Florida.

The four-episode series will also detail Bundy’s crimes — he was convicted of or confessed to murdering more than 30 women in the 1970s — and the media frenzy around his trials.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.

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The trailer for Netflix’s “The Innocent Man” has arrived. Based on John Grisham’s true crime bestseller.

The trailer for Netflix’s “The Innocent Man” has arrived. Based on John Grisham’s true crime bestseller.

Source:  Rolling Stone

Netflix will explore murder, corruption, and wrongful convictions in “The Innocent Man,” an upcoming docuseries based on John Grisham’s best-selling 2006 non-fiction bestselling book of the same name. 

The six-part series, which launches globally on December 14th, focuses on the controversy behind two killings that occurred in Ada, Oklahoma in 1982 and 1984 – leading to murder charges for four men: Tommy Ward, Karl Fontenot, Ron Williamson, and Dennis Fritz.

The latter two were exonerated in 1999 through DNA evidence with help from non-profit legal organization, the Innocence Project; at the time of his release, Williamson had served 11 years on death row and was five days away from being executed.

Ward and Fontenot, who continue to serve life sentences, maintain their innocence.

The trailer for the docuseries establishes the backstory and controversy surrounding the murders, focusing on the men’s controversial confessions and lack of forensic and physical evidence. 

Read the story at Rolling Stone.

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Netflix acquires true crime docuseries “Murder Mountain: Welcome to Humboldt County”

Netflix acquires true crime docuseries “Murder Mountain: Welcome to Humboldt County”

Source:  Variety

Netflix has acquired “Murder Mountain: Welcome to Humboldt County,” a true-crime murder-mystery docuseries from the team behind “Man on Wire” and “LA 92.” The six-part series examines a series of murders that took place in a remote California community.

The Lightbox-produced series premiered on Fuse TV earlier this year. Netflix will launch it globally on Dec. 28.

Murder Mountain: Welcome To Humboldt County

"This is not the hippie marijuana industry anymore."Welcome to Murder Mountain, a secretive and surreal corner of America with a deadly history. Watch the series premiere September 23 at 10PM ET/PT: https://fusion.tv/tv-channel-lineup/

Posted by Fusion TV on Monday, September 17, 2018

 
The series is set in Humboldt County, California, where marijuana is the dominant local industry, and dozens of people have gone missing in the last few years – more than any other county in California.

“Murder Mountain” focuses on the disappearance of 29-year-old Garret Rodriguez in 2013. The investigation into his whereabouts, the producers say, exposes “a wild, lawless place.”

The series also delves into Humboldt’s marijuana farms, both legal and illegal, and provides a glimpse into what it takes for an outlaw farmer to cross over to the legal market.

Read the story at Variety.

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Netflix announces premiere date for true crime docuseries “The Innocent Man” based on John Grisham bestseller

Netflix announces premiere date for true crime docuseries “The Innocent Man” based on John Grisham bestseller

Source:  TheWrap

Netflix has announced a December 14 premiere date for its new six-part true crime docuseries, “The Innocent Man.”

Based on John Grisham’s best-selling non-fiction book, “The Innocent Man: Murder and Injustice in a Small Town,” the series tells the story of Ronald Keith Williamson, a man wrongfully convicted of rape and murder who spent 11 years on death row before he was exonerated.

Directed by Clay Tweel, the project features interviews with the victims’ friends and families, residents of the Oklahoma town where the crimes were committed, attorneys, journalists, and others involved in the case. Grisham will also appear.

Read the story at TheWrap.

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Oxygen’s “Snapped” hits 400 episode milestone

Oxygen’s “Snapped” hits 400 episode milestone

Source:  Realscreen

A select number of series manage to hit the 100 episode milestone in today’s television landscape, but when Oxygen hit play on its latest episode of “Snapped” last night, the true crime hit entered into an elite club.

“Snapped,” which entered into its 24th season earlier this summer, serves as one of the longest running and most influential true crime franchises on television.

The series helped push NBCUniversal to transform Oxygen from a lifestyle and entertainment network into a true crime network for women in February 2017.

The series currently airs in more than 150 countries worldwide and features non-fiction narratives of women who have been convicted or accused of committing murder or attempted murder.

Read the story at Realscreen.

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“Making a Murderer: Part 2” is exhaustive and engrossing. Available now on Netflix.

“Making a Murderer: Part 2” is exhaustive and engrossing. Available now on Netflix.

Source:  Entertainment Weekly

“This time we won’t leave no stone unturned,” says “Making a Murderer’s” Steven Avery in Part 2 of the hit Netflix documentary series. He’s talking about the post-conviction efforts of his lawyer, but it’s also an apt description of the ten new episodes which premiered Friday.

Filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos have spent the last three years chronicling the efforts of Avery and his nephew Brendan Dassey — who were convicted in 2007 of the rape and murder of Teresa Halbach, a 25-year-old photographer, in Wisconsin — to clear their names. The result is a painstaking, sometimes excruciating tale of forensic science, politics, the bond of family, and human fallibility.

Part 2 of “Murderer” begins with a sort of “previously on” recap, as archival news footage traces the documentary from unexpected phenomenon (“It’s all anybody’s talking about!” says Matt Lauer in an unfortunate Today show clip) to the predictable backlash, as critics — including former Calumet County District Attorney Ken Kratz, who prosecuted Avery and Dassey — blast the series for leaving out key evidence discussed at the trial.

Flash forward to 2016, when two very different legal teams are working to prove that someone else is responsible for Halbach’s death.

In Avery’s corner is Kathleen Zellner, a well-known Illinois lawyer who has 19 overturned convictions to her name. Blunt and formidable, with a penchant for self-promotion and statement jewelry, Zellner is a captivating — and sure to be polarizing — figure. “This… is a case of gross, extreme, egregious prosecutorial misconduct,” she says, fixing her steely gaze on the camera.

Much of Part 2 hangs on Zellner’s dogged attempts to dismantle the state’s case against Avery, which entails meticulously evaluating the evidence collected — or, as she asserts, planted — at the crime scene back in 2005.

If Part 1 of “Murderer” inspired thousands of amateur sleuths looking to expose alleged evidence tampering and corruption in the Manitowoc County Sheriff’s Department, Part 2 doubles down on CSI-style wonkery, spending an extensive amount of time on blood-spatter recreations, microscopic images of bullet fragments, partial nanograms of DNA, and so on.

The filmmakers balance the scientific minutiae of Avery’s defense with the more human-interest narrative of Dassey, the intellectually disabled young man whose case features no forensic evidence. Serving as the passionate Mulder to Zellner’s just-the-facts Scully is Laura Nirider, the attorney working to prove that Dassey’s confession — which the then-16-year-old offered piecemeal after a laborious four hours of questioning, with no lawyer or guardian present — was coerced.

Beneath Nirider’s fresh-faced appearance and dimpled smile lurks a fierce legal warrior; she’s also the co-director at the Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. While Zellner confronts every victory and setback with the same stone-faced determination, Nirider and her partner, Steve Drizin, cannot hide their joy or heartbreak as Dassey’s case inches its way through federal court.

This head-vs.-heart contrast between the lawyers is striking and unexpectedly moving, even when the judicial battles get bogged down in legal esoterica. (Get ready to hear a lot about Brady violations, Denny evidence, and en banc reviews.)

Read the story at Entertainment Weekly.

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