This real-life invisibility cloak was designed for military use

This real-life invisibility cloak was designed for military use

Source:  Futurism

Canada’s Hyperstealth Biotechnology already manufactures camouflage military uniforms for countries around the world.

Now the company has patented a new Quantum Stealth material that disguises a military’s soldiers — and even its tanks, aircraft, and ships — by making anything behind it seem invisible.

Earlier this month, Hyperstealth filed a patent for the material, which doesn’t require a power source and is both paper-thin and inexpensive — all traits that could make it appealing for use on the battlefield.

According to the company, the technology works by bending the light around a target to make it seemingly disappear.  This light can be in the visible spectrum, or it can be ultraviolet, infrared, or shortwave infrared light, turning the material into a “broadband invisibility cloak.”

Read the story at Futurism.


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NOVA’s “Look Who’s Driving” is a must-see on the promises and perils of self-driving cars

NOVA’s “Look Who’s Driving” is a must-see on the promises and perils of self-driving cars

Source:  Forbes

If you have any inkling of interest in the status and future of self-driving cars, you have to watch the fast-moving, well-informed, and thought-provoking (yet seat-squirming) new documentary “Look Who’s Driving,”

Come to think of it, even if you don’t yet have an inkling of interest about self-driving cars, you still ought to watch this latest terrific addition to the acclaimed NOVA documentary series known for astutely covering crucial topics in science, high-tech, and engineering.

The 58-minute documentary offers a carefully reasoned and balanced examination of where we are with self-driving cars and posits intelligently about where we might be heading.

“Look Who’s Driving” premieres Wednesday, October 23 on PBS.  It will be available for streaming the following day on NOVA.

Read the story at Forbes.

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Can Dungeons and Dragons help fight screen addiction?

Can Dungeons and Dragons help fight screen addiction?

Source:  Retro Report on PBS

These days parents are worried about their kids’ addiction to Fortnite and other video games.

A generation ago, Dungeons and Dragons was the game that seemed like a menace.  But in a surprising twist, its role-playing strategies are now seen as a counterbalance to the problem of screen addiction.

Watch “Could Dungeons and Dragons Help Fight Screen Addiction?” above and read the story at Retro Report on PBS.


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“Sing Me A Song” reveals the impact of the internet in Bhutan

“Sing Me A Song” reveals the impact of the internet in Bhutan

Source:  Deadline

Online dating has been a staple in Western culture since the inception of Match.com, but in a monastery deep in the mountains of Bhutan, the internet is being introduced for the first time.

In the Thomas Balmes-directed documentary “Sing Me A Song,” we follow one teenage monk’s relationship with this whole new world — specifically online dating.

The documentary, which premieres this month at the Toronto International Film Festival, follows Peyangki (eight years after being featured in Balmes’ “Happiness”) as he experiences the brave new world of technology and smartphones as it lures him away from the ancient practices of monastery life.

The integration of this new discovery of communication leads to an unlikely romance for Peyangki.

Read the story at Deadline.


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“The Great Hack” brings our data nightmare to life

“The Great Hack” brings our data nightmare to life

Source:  Wired

If you’d rather not think about how your life is locked in a dystopian web of your own data, don’t watch the new Netflix documentary “The Great Hack.”

But if you want to see, really see the way data tracking, harvesting, and targeting takes the strands of information we generate and ties them around us until we are smothered by governments and companies, then don’t miss this film.

Ostensibly, it tells the story of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but even if you know that sordid tale already, the film is worth a look.

The documentary uses the scandal as a framework to illustrate the data mining structures and algorithms that are undermining individual liberty and democratic society, one Facebook like and meme at a time.

“The Great Hack” is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Wired.

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