“Sing Me A Song” reveals the impact of the internet in Bhutan

“Sing Me A Song” reveals the impact of the internet in Bhutan

Source:  Deadline

Online dating has been a staple in Western culture since the inception of Match.com, but in a monastery deep in the mountains of Bhutan, the internet is being introduced for the first time.

In the Thomas Balmes-directed documentary “Sing Me A Song,” we follow one teenage monk’s relationship with this whole new world — specifically online dating.

The documentary, which premieres this month at the Toronto International Film Festival, follows Peyangki (eight years after being featured in Balmes’ “Happiness”) as he experiences the brave new world of technology and smartphones as it lures him away from the ancient practices of monastery life.

The integration of this new discovery of communication leads to an unlikely romance for Peyangki.

Read the story at Deadline.


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“The Great Hack” brings our data nightmare to life

“The Great Hack” brings our data nightmare to life

Source:  Wired

If you’d rather not think about how your life is locked in a dystopian web of your own data, don’t watch the new Netflix documentary “The Great Hack.”

But if you want to see, really see the way data tracking, harvesting, and targeting takes the strands of information we generate and ties them around us until we are smothered by governments and companies, then don’t miss this film.

Ostensibly, it tells the story of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but even if you know that sordid tale already, the film is worth a look.

The documentary uses the scandal as a framework to illustrate the data mining structures and algorithms that are undermining individual liberty and democratic society, one Facebook like and meme at a time.

“The Great Hack” is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Wired.

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The new technology Cold War runs through a cable on the ocean floor

The new technology Cold War runs through a cable on the ocean floor

Source:  Field of Vision

The United States and China are in the midst of a power struggle: a new Cold War of technology with companies like Huawei at the center.

Field of Vision’s “Cablestreet” offers viewers an unprecedented look inside the notorious telecom company.

Watch “Cablestreet” above, and read the story at Field of Vision.

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 Westinghouse films offer intriguing look at how factories — and technology — worked in the early 20th century

 Westinghouse films offer intriguing look at how factories — and technology — worked in the early 20th century

Source:  The Washington Post

Women in blouses and long skirts clock in, then lean over machines, winding wire into large spools.  Men use cranes to nudge parts of a massive generator into place.

Over a century ago, these workers, all employees of Westinghouse companies, contributed to the most ambitious, high-tech projects of their day.

On a Library of Congress website, their labor — and innovations that changed the way Americans worked and traveled — comes to flickering life.

Shot in 1904 and conceived as “actuality films,” the 21 Westinghouse Works documentary shorts were designed to show off Westinghouse’s industrial innovations.

Read the story at The Washington Post.

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“I Am Human” explores the future of neurotechnology

“I Am Human” explores the future of neurotechnology

Source:  The Verge

We’re in a dark moment for the tech industry: a time when some new technologies have been adopted recklessly and backfired terribly, and others have developed far more slowly than their creators hoped.

Against the backdrop of this pessimism, a film like “I Am Human” — a fundamentally optimistic documentary about neuroscience and brain medicine — feels surprisingly refreshing.

“I Am Human” is a moving trio of narratives about people who are trying to overcome serious physical limitations with cutting-edge brain science.

The debut feature from Taryn Southern and Elena Gaby offers an accessible look at a complicated subject — even if it occasionally succumbs to unnecessary hype.

“I Am Human” recently screened at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Read the story at The Verge.

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