Asif Kapadia talks about his new doc “Diego Maradona”

Asif Kapadia talks about his new doc “Diego Maradona”

Source:  Variety

Global sports icon and lauded soccer player Diego Maradona’s dramatic life intrigued Oscar and BAFTA winner director Asif Kapadia (“Amy,” “Senna”) while he was still in film school.  “It had an incredibly strong backstory and extremes of good and dark,” he recalls.

Fast forward to more than 20 years later as his feature documentary “Diego Maradona” premieres at the Cannes Film Festival.

 

Drawing on more than 500 hours of rare footage from the Argentine icon’s personal archives, the documentary charts the trials and triumphs of the legendary soccer player during his years at Italian club Napoli. as the charismatic star came into his own and mixed with a streetwise crowd.

HBO has secured U.S. rights to “Diego Maradona” and plans a limited theatrical run before the film premieres on the network on September 24.

Read the interview  at Variety.

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Antoine Fuqua discusses his new HBO doc “What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali”

Antoine Fuqua discusses his new HBO doc “What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali”

Source:  Business Insider

HBO has produced three documentaries about Muhammad Ali over the years and all three won Peabody Awards.

Director Antoine Fuqua was well aware of this storied history, but pushed away all the reasons why another Ali doc shouldn’t be made because of one reason: None of those docs were narrated by Ali himself.

“It’s hard to find documentaries where people are telling their own story,” Fuqua told Business Insider.  “It’s always a lot of talking heads and everyone else telling stories.  But to do a documentary and clearly do it in his voice, it seemed it would be a hard job to find that material to have Ali telling us a story, but everybody was on board.”

“What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali” is available now on HBO.

Read the story at Business Insider.

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“One Child Nation’s” Wang Nanfu: “Every film is a brand new beginning”

“One Child Nation’s” Wang Nanfu: “Every film is a brand new beginning”

Source:  Variety

Director Wang Nanfu wracked up accolades for her debut feature “Hooligan Sparrow,” a riveting, guerrilla-style exposé of sexual abuse in China that made the Academy Award shortlist for best documentary.

But as she prepared to return to the cutting room for her sophomore feature “I Am Another You,” she learned a valuable lesson that guides her to this day.

“I thought it would be easier, and it wasn’t,” Wang said. “The previous success of one successful work will not necessarily translate into your next work.  Every film is a brand new beginning.”

Wang recently appeared at Hot Docs with journalist and film critic Eric Hynes, where she discussed her career as a documentary filmmaker and the role that she plays as a character in her own films.

The director’s latest film, “One Child Nation,” was acquired by Amazon Studios after it won the grand jury prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Read the story at Variety.

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Ron Howard talks Pavarotti’s impact and career at film screening

Ron Howard talks Pavarotti’s impact and career at film screening

Source:  Variety

If one is an anomaly, two is a coincidence, and three is a trend, then Ron Howard might strictly become a music documentarian after “Pavarotti” hits theaters.

The documentary about the legendary Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti comes on the heels of Howard’s “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week” and “Made in America,” a look at Jay-Z’s music festival of the same name.

“Look at the way music has become so important in the medium in general, whether it’s scripted or documentary.  I think it’s something to rally an audience around.  Technology is such that we can offer a kind of concert experience,” Howard told Variety at a screening of the film on Wednesday at CAA in Los Angeles.  “Our intention was to make this as much of an opera as it a human-interest story about Pavarotti.”

“Pavarotti” arrives in theaters on June 7.

Read the story at Variety.

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Billy Corben on his new documentary “Screwball”, Alex Rodriguez and Tony Bosch

Billy Corben on his new documentary “Screwball”, Alex Rodriguez and Tony Bosch

Source:  CBS Miami

It’s been six years since the Biogenesis steroid scandal rocked Major League Baseball.

While Alex Rodriguez’s fight against the MLB ended up becoming the biggest story, all of this began with Tony Bosch and his anti-aging clinic in Miami.

Filmmaker Billy Corben documents all of this in his new film “Screwball,” and he says Miami is the perfect place for a scandal like this to take place.

“It’s America’s Casa Blanca.  If it appears on the outside as this lawless place where everyone and everything is for sale, that’s because it is a lawless place where everyone and everything are for sale,” said Corben in an interview with CBS Miami. “The reality very much matches the perception.  When you have a city that thrives on a predominately gray market economy, gray market people fit in just fine there.”

Read the story at CBS Miami.

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Ai Weiwei talks new doc “The Rest”, criticises global film industry for working with China

Ai Weiwei talks new doc “The Rest”, criticises global film industry for working with China

Source:  Screen Daily

Two years ago, renowned Chinese artist and filmmaker Ai Weiwei premiered his feature documentary “Human Flow” at the Venice Film Festival.

The film was an unfaltering exploration of the global refugee crisis and was crafted from more than 900 hours of footage shot across 23 nations and 40 of the world’s largest refugee camps.

On Thursday, Weiwei is premiered his follow-up feature, “The Rest,” at Copenhagen’s CPH:DOX festival.  The under-the-radar film is essentially a follow-up to “Human Flow,” again depicting the refugee crisis but this time in a more intimate manner.

On the eve of the screening, “Screen Daily” caught up with the Berlin-based director, who continues to resist censorship from his home country of China.

Read the interview at Screen Daily.

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