How Cameron Crowe produced a David Crosby documentary and found his future

How Cameron Crowe produced a David Crosby documentary and found his future

Source:  IndieWire

David Crosby has shaped Cameron Crowe’s life.  The first time he interviewed the musician, it was 1976 and Crowe was an 18-year-old Rolling Stone wunderkind.  Now Crowe is 62, and he says that producing “David Crosby: Remember My Name” is the project that will determine his future.

When Crowe ran into the aging rocker in the hallway at J.J. Abrams’ Bad Robot offices, Crosby was with Jill Mazursky; she was producing A.J. Eaton’s documentary about him, and asked Crowe to do one interview with Crosby for the film.

Crowe was then immersed in production on his 2016 Showtime series “Roadies,” but agreed to do just one more deep dive with Crosby.

And, like Michael Corleone in “Godfather 3,” Crowe got pulled back in.

Read the story at IndieWire.

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“Paris Is Burning” director Jennie Livingston discusses the spin-off idea too painful to make

“Paris Is Burning” director Jennie Livingston discusses the spin-off idea too painful to make

Source:  Entertainment Weekly

For the past 28 years, “Paris Is Burning” filmmaker Jennie Livingston has watched her seminal documentary help clear a path for the next generation of queer projects — from RuPaul’s “Drag Race” to “Pose” — to follow into the mainstream spotlight.

Now, as the nonfiction masterpiece — which follows a group of black and Latinx drag performers and trans women as they explore their art on the Harlem ballroom scene in late 1980s New York City — resurges with a special theatrical restoration cut, Livingston is revealing a colleague’s idea for a spinoff she says is too painful to put in motion.

“A good friend of mine was always like, ‘I think we should make a film about the murder of Venus and try and solve it,’” Livingston tells Entertainment Weekly, referencing the death of “Paris is Burning” subject Venus Xtravaganza, an eccentric trans woman and performance artist who was found strangled to death in a hotel room in 1988, three years before the film hit theaters.  Her killer was never found,

Read the interview at Entertainment Weekly.

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An interview with “Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project” director Matt Wolf

An interview with “Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project” director Matt Wolf

Source:  American Film Institute

Beginning with the Iranian Hostage Crisis in 1979, Marion Stokes secretly recorded television 24 hours a day at a time when networks did not systematically archive the news.

Stokes was a fierce activist, motivated by truth and freedom, and after she began working in television, she quickly recognized the influence media had on society.

As she aged, she became a wealthy reclusive archivist, recording over 70,000 VHS tapes in an effort to protect truth and check facts long before “fake news” became a catch phrase.

The American Film Institute recently spoke with director Matt Wolf about his new film, “Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project.”

Read the interview at the American Film Institute.

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“Sex Trafficking in America” filmmakers discuss the impact they hope their documentary will have

“Sex Trafficking in America” filmmakers discuss the impact they hope their documentary will have

Source:  FRONTLINE

When she was 16 years old, Kat was abducted and trafficked by men she met online — all in her home state of Arizona.

“I didn’t even know what sex trafficking was before I was taken,” Kat says in the FRONTLINE documentary “Sex Trafficking in America.”  “I didn’t know that I would end up in this situation that I ended up in.”

Jezza Neumann and Lauren Mucciolo — the director and producer behind the film — found that, like Kat, many people were unaware of the American woman and girls being sexually exploited within the U.S.

“Most people thought it was an international thing,” Neumann said.

To capture that hidden reality, Neumann and Mucciolo followed a police unit in Phoenix, Arizona, combatting child sexual exploitation over the course of two and a half years.  They talked to FRONTLINE about how they found the story, and what impact they hope the documentary has.

Watch “Sex Trafficking in America” on PBS and read the interview at FRONTLINE.

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Asif Kapadia talks about his new doc “Diego Maradona”

Asif Kapadia talks about his new doc “Diego Maradona”

Source:  Variety

Global sports icon and lauded soccer player Diego Maradona’s dramatic life intrigued Oscar and BAFTA winner director Asif Kapadia (“Amy,” “Senna”) while he was still in film school.  “It had an incredibly strong backstory and extremes of good and dark,” he recalls.

Fast forward to more than 20 years later as his feature documentary “Diego Maradona” premieres at the Cannes Film Festival.

 

Drawing on more than 500 hours of rare footage from the Argentine icon’s personal archives, the documentary charts the trials and triumphs of the legendary soccer player during his years at Italian club Napoli. as the charismatic star came into his own and mixed with a streetwise crowd.

HBO has secured U.S. rights to “Diego Maradona” and plans a limited theatrical run before the film premieres on the network on September 24.

Read the interview  at Variety.

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Antoine Fuqua discusses his new HBO doc “What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali”

Antoine Fuqua discusses his new HBO doc “What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali”

Source:  Business Insider

HBO has produced three documentaries about Muhammad Ali over the years and all three won Peabody Awards.

Director Antoine Fuqua was well aware of this storied history, but pushed away all the reasons why another Ali doc shouldn’t be made because of one reason: None of those docs were narrated by Ali himself.

“It’s hard to find documentaries where people are telling their own story,” Fuqua told Business Insider.  “It’s always a lot of talking heads and everyone else telling stories.  But to do a documentary and clearly do it in his voice, it seemed it would be a hard job to find that material to have Ali telling us a story, but everybody was on board.”

“What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali” is available now on HBO.

Read the story at Business Insider.

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