Playstation releases fascinating God of War making-of documentary “Raising Kratos”

Playstation releases fascinating God of War making-of documentary “Raising Kratos”

Source:  GameCrate

There’s no doubt that 2018’s God of War was last year’s best video game on the PlayStation 4 and one of the best video games of the past ten years.

To celebrate the one year anniversary of its release, PlayStation has released a fascinating making-of documentary of the game, “Raising Kratos” that follows the path of its development.

The film runs about two hours and covers pretty much every aspect of its development from how to reboot the franchise after an eight-year hiatus to the game’s reception after it was released.

Watch “Raising Kratos” above or on YouTube.

Read the story at GameCrate.

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New Netflix series from the creators of “Chef’s Table” celebrates the street food of Asia

New Netflix series from the creators of “Chef’s Table” celebrates the street food of Asia

Source:  Eater

The makers of “Chef’s Table” have a new series headed to Netflix later this month that will focus on the renowned street vendors who sell inexpensive food in modest, family-run restaurants and hawker stalls in Asia.

In the just-released trailer for “Street Food,” vendors are shown preparing a dizzying array of noodles, seafood dishes, roasted meats, soups, and snacks.  It’s clear from the trailer that, much like “Chef’s Table,” the new show will cover the life stories of these talented cooks while also highlighting their signature dishes.

Each episode focuses on one destination and three or four local street food stars.  For its first season, dubbed “Street Food: Asia,” the series will take viewers to Thailand, India, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Philippines, and Vietnam.

One of the vendors included in the series is Jay Fai, the first Bangkok street-side cook to receive a Michelin star.

“Street Food” premieres April 26 on Netflix.

Read the story of Eater.

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Noclip makes long-form gaming documentaries that break nearly every YouTube rule

Noclip makes long-form gaming documentaries that break nearly every YouTube rule

Source:  The Verge

Noclip’s latest documentary, an hour-long exploration of the development of the popular spacefaring indie game “Astroneer,” doesn’t look like a normal YouTube video.

Not only is it long, but it’s also completely devoid of advertising, and it fails to cater to YouTube’s all-powerful algorithm.

That’s par for the course for Noclip since the company launched in 2016.

“I knew it wasn’t going to get that much traffic, but it’s one of the most important things we’ve done,” Noclip founder Danny O’Dwyer says of the “Astroneer” video. “It’s one where I could show my parents, and they’d understand [game development].”

Read the story at The Verge.

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Doo doo doo doo doo doo. Meet the creators of “Baby Shark”

Doo doo doo doo doo doo. Meet the creators of “Baby Shark”

Source:  VICE

Apparently, the secret is to think like a toddler.

If you’ve never heard “Baby Shark”, you’ve somehow managed to escape the most infectious song in recent memory.

The “Baby Shark” video, consisting of a simple animation of a family of cute sharks, has over two billion views on YouTube.

“Baby Shark” wasn’t an accidental viral hit.  Pinkfong, the Korean educational entertainment brand that created “Baby Shark,” has become a toddler music juggernaut over the past few years.

Part of Pinkfong’s success is their attention to all aspects of what makes a song catch on, including creating dances tailored to the limited motor skills of pre-verbal children.

VICE News visited the Pinkfong headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, to see how baby hits are made.

Read the story at VICE.

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Meet the growing, worldwide community who believe the earth is flat in “Behind the Curve”

Meet the growing, worldwide community who believe the earth is flat in “Behind the Curve”

Source:  Entertainment Weekly

There are scientific references to a spherical earth dating back to ancient Greece.  In 240 B.C., Eratosthenes used trigonometry and measuring shadows to estimate the Earth’s circumference.  The explorer Ferdinand Magellan returned from circumnavigating the globe in 1522.

And yet, in the year 2019, there is a stalwart contingent, united by the internet, who sincerely believe that the earth is flat.

This group is the subject of director Daniel J. Clark’s documentary, “Behind the Curve.”  He focuses primarily on a couple of the group’s charismatic leaders, Mark Sargent and Patricia Steere.

But rather than trying to disprove their beliefs (don’t worry, they do that to themselves — the Flat Earthers fund a number of scientific experiments that don’t go as well as they would have hoped),  Clark approaches his subjects with empathy and humanity.

“Behind the Curve” is sad, funny, and fascinating, but it’s also a reminder of the mental gymnastics we would all go to keep our worldview comfortably known.

“Behind the Curve” is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Entertainment Weekly.

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