“Apollo 11” wins big at Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards

“Apollo 11” wins big at Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

“Apollo 11” was named best documentary at the fourth annual Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards on Sunday night.

The ceremony took place at BRIC in Brooklyn.

Overall, “Apollo 11” was the night’s biggest winner.   Along with best documentary, the film also took home awards for best archival documentary, best science/nature documentary, best editing, and best score.

The award for best director resulted in a tie between Peter Jackson for “They Shall Not Grow Old” and Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert for “American Factory.”

“They Shall Not Grow Old” was also named most innovative documentary, while “American Factory” also won the award for best political documentary,

See the complete list of winners at The Hollywood Reporter.


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Oscars: Malaysia selects a documentary as its entry in the best international feature film category

Oscars: Malaysia selects a documentary as its entry in the best international feature film category

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

Malaysia has for the first time picked a documentary as its Oscar hopeful with the announcement that “M for Malaysia” has been submitted as its entry in the best international feature film category.

Directed and produced by Ineza Roussille and Dian Lee, the film sheds light on the various events and players involved in the Malaysian general election of 2018, which ended with former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad returning to power.

The film recently screened at the Busan International Film Festival.

The 92nd Academy Awards air February 9, 2020 on ABC.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.


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How the National Geographic network tackles climate change without seeming like homework

How the National Geographic network tackles climate change without seeming like homework

Source:  Adweek

The National Geographic brand has been covering climate change for more than five decades, but it’s only been three years since the National Geographic network, which debuted in 2001, has embraced the topic as a central component of its TV strategy.

“I think the belief at the time was that no one was going to watch that,” said National Geographic Global Networks president Courteney Monroe, who began to change that after she took over the U.S. network in 2014 and added global oversight a year later.

Since then, National Geographic has regularly tackled climate change through a variety of programs, including the 2016 documentary “Before the Flood” (executive produced by Leonardo DiCaprio), 2018 documentary “Paris to Pittsburgh” (about the actions individuals and local communities are taking to combat climate change) and most recently, the Emmy-nominated miniseries “Hostile Planet” (which aired last spring).

Read the story at Adweek.


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“Leaving Neverland,” “Our Planet” win Emmy Awards for best documentary special, series

“Leaving Neverland,” “Our Planet” win Emmy Awards for best documentary special, series

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

HBO’s “Leaving Neverland” won the Emmy award for outstanding documentary or nonfiction special at the 2019 Creative Arts Emmys last night.  Netflix’s “Our Planet” took home the Emmy for best documentary or nonfiction series.

Dan Reed directed “Leaving Neverland,” a four-hour film which features testimony from Wade Robson and James Safechuck, two men who claim to have suffered childhood sexual abuse at the hands of the late Michael Jackson.

Backstage, Reed explained that prior to taking on the project, he didn’t know much about Jackson, nor did he have an opinion if Jackson was “guilty or innocent.”

“I thought the two guys [Robson and Safechuck] would never speak out in front of camera,” Reed said, adding that in talking to them, he was inclined to believe their claims in part because they described what he considered romantic relationships.

See the complete list of documentary category winners at the Emmys website.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.


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Have National Geographic and P&G created a new marketing model with “Activate”?

Have National Geographic and P&G created a new marketing model with “Activate”?

Source:  Fast Company

It’s not product placement.  It’s not sponsored content.  It’s prestige television.

“Activate,” a six-part documentary series that premiered Thursday on the National Geographic Channel, features celebrities such as music producer Pharrell Williams, rapper Common, and actors Darren Criss and Uzo Aduba, and highlights the work of grassroots activists trying to end cash bail, eradicating plastic pollution, and more.

Each installment also includes information about how Procter & Gamble, an underwriter of the series, is addressing the theme of the episode.

P&G “is genuinely committed to putting social good at the center of their business model,” says Hugh Evans, CEO of Global Citizen, which is coproducing the series. ‘Activate’ was a logical extension of that model.”

The marketing world is closely watching “Activate” and other projects like it: Cincinnati-based Proctor & Gamble is one of the largest advertisers in the world, spending $2.9 billion in the U.S. last year.

If corporations find it more effective to fund—and play a supporting role in—documentaries and narrative storytelling, it would whipsaw an industry that’s struggling to engage audiences and win their loyalties.

Read the story at Fast Company.


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National Geographic Documentary Films pushes into shorts with two new films

National Geographic Documentary Films pushes into shorts with two new films

Source:  IndieWire

After playing home to such Oscar-winning documentary features as recent winner “Free Solo” and other awards season favorites like “Jane” and “LA 92,” National Geographic Documentary Films is turning its attention to another vibrant side of the doc world: short films.

The debut slate will include documentary shorts “Lost and Found,” from Academy Award-winning director Orlando von Einsiedel, and “The Nightcrawlers” from Academy Award-winning producer Joanna Natasegara and first-time director Alexander A. Mora.

After upcoming festival premieres, both “Lost and Found” and “The Nightcrawlers” will open for a week at the Metrograph in New York City before premiering on the National Geographic Channel in October, followed by a wide digital release.

Read the story at IndieWire.

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