Netflix docuseries “Pandemic” puts a face to the doctors and public health officials battling the coronavirus outbreak

Netflix docuseries “Pandemic” puts a face to the doctors and public health officials battling the coronavirus outbreak

Source:  Decider

If you’ve already anxiety-watched Steven Soderbergh’s “Contagion,” Netflix has the perfect docuseries to watch next.

In January, Netflix released “Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak,” a six-part docuseries about the spread of viral illness around the world.

While the series doesn’t explicitly mention coronavirus, it does put a face to the public health officials, doctors, and influenza experts on the frontlines of the COVID-19 outbreak.

“Pandemic” attempts to explain, in layperson’s terms, how viral outbreaks begin and spread around the globe.

When the series was released in January, coronavirus was just beginning to spread in China and had yet to reach other parts of the world.

“Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak” is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Decider.


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CBSN Originals presents “The War on Science”

CBSN Originals presents “The War on Science”

Source:  CBS News

As the government struggles to contain growing public concern about coronavirus from spilling over into panic, it’s faced with a potentially larger problem — trust in science.

More access to misinformation online is casting doubt on established science, making it more difficult for many to separate scientific fact from questionable ideas.

As social media posts and YouTube videos have increasingly cast doubt on science, surveys show a decline in the number of young Americans that believe in basic and long-established scientific facts, and there are troubling signs that fringe ideas are making their way into classrooms.

In the CBSN Original “The War on Science,” Adam Yamaguchi discovers pockets of America where politics, religion, social media, and conspiracy theories drive a deepening suspicion of science.

Watch “The War on Science” above and read the story at CBS News.


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“Bedlam” examines the mental health crisis in Los Angeles

“Bedlam” examines the mental health crisis in Los Angeles

Source:  Independent Lens on PBS

Haunted by the death of his mentally ill sister, psychiatrist Ken Rosenberg takes on the role of filmmaker to examine a national health crisis.

“Bedlam” follows the stories of people grappling with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other chronic psychiatric conditions in Los Angeles.

Impossible to mask when untreated, their symptoms shove them into the path of police officers, ER doctors, nurses, lawyers, and prison guards.

Filmed over the course of five years, Rosenberg takes us inside Los Angeles County’s overwhelmed and vastly under-resourced psych ER, a nearby jail warehousing thousands of psychiatric patients, and the homes — and homeless encampments — of people suffering from severe mental illness.

“Bedlam” premieres April 13 on Independent Lens on PBS.


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Coping with severe OCD as a teenager

Coping with severe OCD as a teenager

Source:  VICE

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder that often involves ritualization, anxiety, and intrusive thoughts.

While millions suffer from OCD, the mental disorder is often misunderstood by the general public and misrepresented in the media and pop culture.

Allison Gurvich is a 14-year-old OCD sufferer who shares her personal struggles with VICE in the hopes of destigmatizing the illness and creating a support community for others affected by OCD.

Watch “My Life with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder” at VICE.


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Netflix releases “Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak” as coronavirus spreads

Netflix releases “Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak” as coronavirus spreads

Source:  Fast Company

Last week, Netflix premiered its new docuseries “Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak”—and the timing couldn’t have been more prescient.

In late December, China alerted the World Health Organization to several cases of pneumonia in the port city of Wuhan.  After ruling out the SARS virus, it was determined on January 7 that the cause of the illnesses was a new coronavirus, which is in the same family as SARS.

By January 22, the day “Pandemic” premiered on Netflix, the death toll from the coronavirus outbreak had risen to 17 with more than 550 infections—and those numbers have been climbing ever since.

To date, there have been more than 100 deaths and 4,515 confirmed cases of the coronavirus virus across 16 countries including the United States, Thailand, Japan, France, Canada, and Germany.

“Pandemic: How to Prevent an Outbreak” is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Fast Company.


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The Hidden Crisis in Rural America

The Hidden Crisis in Rural America

Source:  The Atlantic

It’s prohibitively difficult to access mental-health services in rural America.  That’s because, relative to urban areas, rural counties have so few mental-health professionals.

The majority of non-metropolitan counties in the U.S. don’t have a psychiatrist, and almost half lack a psychologist.

The paucity has resulted in a public-health crisis—rural Americans suffering from a psychiatric condition are more likely to encounter a police officer than receive treatment.

In the short documentary “Out of Sight, Out of Mind,” directed by James Burns for PBS’ Independent Lens, residents of Cochise County, Arizona speak to the alarming implications of the area’s lack of psychiatric resources.

Read the story at The Atlantic.


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