“Mossville: When Great Trees Fall” profiles the last resident of a Louisiana town decimated by the building of 14 petrochemical plants

“Mossville: When Great Trees Fall” profiles the last resident of a Louisiana town decimated by the building of 14 petrochemical plants

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

“We’re in beautiful downtown Mossville,” says Stacey Ryan, the central figure in the documentary “Mossville: When Great Trees Fall,” as he waves his arm toward the supremely ugly petrochemical plants and construction projects surrounding him.  “Population of one,” he adds bitterly, essentially summing up the central theme of Alex Glustrom’s powerful film concerning the environmental ravaging of a once-thriving community.

Ryan is the last man standing in a rural town that at one point had a population of 8,000.  Founded in the late 19th century by freed slaves, Mossville, Louisiana, is where his family has lived for generations.

Once filled with natural beauty, the town was essentially taken over by Sasol, or South African Synthetic Oil Limited, an energy and chemical company that wanted to expand to America.

The company was welcomed with open arms by then-Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, seen in a news clip extolling the jobs and prosperity that the company would bring to the state.

Unfortunately, it came with a cost.  Sasol built 14 plants in the community, and the resulting chemical spills, fires, and general contamination eventually drove out all of the residents – except for Ryan.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.


Enjoy documentaries?  Receive the day’s documentary news every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.

“Eating Up Easter” examines the wasteful side of tourism

“Eating Up Easter” examines the wasteful side of tourism

Source:  The New York Times

Easter Island is often described as “mysterious” and “mystical.”

That outsider perspective is reflected in archival TV segments included in “Eating Up Easter,” a documentary about the very real, terrestrial, socio-economic concerns of the island locally known as Rapa Nui, which sits in the Pacific Ocean, more than 2,000 miles from Chile.

While its megalithic moai statues have made Rapa Nui a vacation attraction, the film provides a more microcosmic insight from residents, who talk about how tourism and modernization are ruining their ancestral land.

“Eating Up Easter” is available now on Music Box Films.

Read the story at The New York Times.


Enjoy documentaries?  Receive the day’s documentary news every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.

Michael Moore releases new documentary “Planet of the Humans” on his YouTube channel

Michael Moore releases new documentary “Planet of the Humans” on his YouTube channel

Source:  Michael Moore’s Instagram

SURPRISE!  Just dropped a brand new feature film, right now, just finished, and just posted minutes ago on my YouTube channel!

It’s called “Planet of the Humans” and it’s executive produced by me and directed by my longtime co-producer, Jeff Gibbs and produced by author Ozzie Zehner.

Have we lost the climate change battle — and are we afraid to admit it?  We are lifelong environmentalIsts and in this movie we expose some harsh truths about the failures of our movement — and what we need to do immediately to reboot and save this planet.  We are way beyond out of time.

Greed and the profit motive have derailed us.  Some organizations have sold out.

It’s 50 years after the first Earth Day, and the Earth is crumbling.  The current pandemic is nothing less than a brutal Coming Attraction.

We all know what’s ahead. Only one species caused this – and only that species can fix it.

This is a provocative, searing documentary.  It’s why we’re releasing it right now and why we’re making it available free of charge. Please watch it today.

Watch “Planet of the Apes” on Michael Moore’s YouTube channel.

Source: Michael Moore’s Instagram


Enjoy documentaries?  Receive the day’s documentary news every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.

Find out the truth about recycling in FRONTLINE’s “Plastic Wars”

Find out the truth about recycling in FRONTLINE’s “Plastic Wars”

Source:  FRONTLINE

Despite efforts across the country to reduce the use of the material, the plastics industry is rapidly scaling up new production and promoting a familiar solution: recycling.

But it’s estimated that no more than 10 percent of plastic produced has ever actually been recycled — and as it turns out, the plastics industry isn’t surprised.

“Plastic Wars,” a joint investigation from FRONTLINE and NPR, reveals how plastic makers for decades have publicly promoted recycling, despite from almost the beginning privately expressing doubts that widespread plastic recycling would ever be economically viable.

“There was never an enthusiastic belief that recycling was ultimately going to work in a significant way,” Lewis Freeman, former VP of government affairs for the Society of the Plastics Industry, tells FRONTLINE and NPR.

That didn’t stop the industry from promoting recycling heavily, counting on a simple strategy: “If the public thinks the recycling is working, then they’re not going to be as concerned about the environment,” says Larry Thomas, who formerly headed the SPI.

From FRONTLINE producer Rick Young, NPR correspondent Laura Sullivan, and their team, “Plastic Wars” is a powerful look at how the plastics industry has used recycling to help sell more plastic — and why the plastic waste problem has only grown.

Watch “Plastic Wars” above and read the story at FRONTLINE.


Enjoy documentaries?  Receive the day’s documentary news every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.

“The Last Glaciers” highlights the grim effects of climate change

“The Last Glaciers” highlights the grim effects of climate change

Source:  South China Morning Post

A year after releasing “A Plastic Ocean,” a documentary about the disastrous effects of disposable plastic on the world’s oceans, Craig Leeson turned his attention to a different project.

In 2017, the Australian and long-time Hong Kong resident went filming in the Alps to focus on extreme alpine sports – but when he found out about the work of a group of French scientists measuring ice deep inside the glaciers, he was drawn back to the mission of shining a light on the perils of climate change.

The film traces the vanishing snowlines in Asia, Europe, South America, and Antarctica, in a stark global odyssey that highlights how human activity has wreaked havoc on the environment.

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, “The Last Glaciers” was scheduled to hit the festival circuit this summer.

Read the story at the South China Morning Post.


Enjoy documentaries?  Receive the day’s documentary news every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.

Watch VICE’s new documentary on the aftermath of Australia’s black summer bushfires

Watch VICE’s new documentary on the aftermath of Australia’s black summer bushfires

Source:  VICE

Toward the end of 2019, Australia was wracked by some of the most devastating wildfires in Earth’s recorded history.

Millions of acres, thousands of homes, and dozens of human lives were lost to the fires, which reached their zenith in the country’s southeast on New Year’s Eve.

VICE’s Gavin Butler visited the bushfire-ravaged communities to tell the stories of the people still living in the disaster zone who have been forced to take the relief effort into their own hands.

Watch “Fire Country” above and read the story at VICE.


Enjoy documentaries?  Receive the day’s documentary news every morning.  Sign up for DocumentaryNews Daily.