Michael Bloomberg and National Geographic team up for global warming doc “Paris To Pittsburgh”

Michael Bloomberg and National Geographic team up for global warming doc “Paris To Pittsburgh”

Source:  Deadline

The National Geographic Channel will air Bloomberg Philanthropies’ second film, “Paris to Pittsburgh,” a film that takes on the devastating effects of global warming.

The doc will premiere Wednesday, December 12, at 9pm ET/PT and will air globally in 172 countries and 45 languages beginning in the U.S.

“Paris to Pittsburgh” brings to life the impassioned efforts of individuals who are battling the most severe threats of climate change in their own backyards.

Set against the national debate over coal and clean energy — and the Trump administration’s decision to exit the Paris Climate Agreement — the film captures what’s at stake for communities around the country and the inspiring ways Americans are responding.

Read the story at Deadline.

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“The Devil We Know” exposes Dupont’s cover-up of Teflon’s harmful environmental effects on a West Virginia town

“The Devil We Know” exposes Dupont’s cover-up of Teflon’s harmful environmental effects on a West Virginia town

Source:  IndieWire

Following “An Inconvenient Sequel,” “The Cove,” and “Chasing Ice,” a pointed and thorough environmental documentary can have a lasting impact on the global conversation around pollution and climate change.

Filmmaker Stephanie Soechtig has been a leading voice in the genre and adds yet another environmental atrocity to the pile in her fourth feature film, “The Devil We Know.”

The film takes aim at powerful corporations such as Dupont and 3M, following a group of whistleblowers who claim both companies knew of the harmful environmental effects that the patented chemical Teflon had on the residents of Parkersburg, West Virginia and covered up the facts for decades.

“The Devil We Know” premieres October 16 on iTunes.

Read the story at IndieWire. 

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Patagonia’s latest doc “Blue Heart” joins the fight to save Europe’s last wild rivers

Patagonia’s latest doc “Blue Heart” joins the fight to save Europe’s last wild rivers

Source:  Fast Company

A group of women from the small Bosnian village of Kruščica have stood guard on a bridge to the town for 24 hours a day for more than 300 days. They’re a human blockade denying access to construction crews set to begin building a major hydropower dam project on the Kruščica river.

In the film, the women explain that it’s just them because local police are less likely to arrest them, while male protestors would have been beaten, arrested, and dragged away long ago.

Finally, this past June the cantonal court of Novi Travnik, Bosnia and Herzegovina, ruled that the environmental permit for dam construction on the river should be annulled, outlawing any further construction work on the proposed dam. But the women are still on that bridge, just in case.

The story of the women of Kruščica is just one story told in Patagonia’s latest feature documentary, “Blue Heart,” which shines a light on the work being done to protect Europe’s last wild rivers, all in the Balkans, from the threat of 3,000 hydropower dam projects.

It’s the second major documentary that the brand has produced, following 2014’s “DamNation,” around the theme of saving wild rivers and the threat of both new and deadbeat dams.

The idea of a Ventura, California, company, an American brand, investing in telling a little-known story that takes place in a part of the world that many of its fleece vest-loving faithful might find tough to locate on a map may seem random. But both brand executives and director Britt Caillouette say that’s exactly the point.

“Blue Heart” is available now on iTunes.

Read the story at Fast Company.

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Victor Kossakovsky’s “Aquarela” captures the raw power of water

Victor Kossakovsky’s “Aquarela” captures the raw power of water

Source:  Variety

In titling “Aquarela,” his latest grandiose, sense-pummelling documentary ride, one has to wonder if iconoclastic Russian director Victor Kossakovsky was the tiniest bit annoyed that a certain awards juggernaut from last year’s Venice Film Festival had already taken “The Shape of Water.”

That would be the best way to describe what this globe-trotting, at-one-with-the-element enterprise is really about, as Kossakovsky offers a dazzling overview of water in its shifting array of forms, from the frozen-over Lake Baikal in Southern Siberia to the rains lashing Miami in the midst of Hurricane Irma to the intangible rainbow rising from the tumble of Venezuela’s Angel Falls.

A feast of HD imagery so crisp as to be almost disorienting, this is immersive experiential cinema with no firm storytelling trajectory, though viewers can read what environmental warnings they may into its rushing spectacle.

Read the story at Variety.

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Expedition Antarctica: A father and son’s journey to save the planet

Expedition Antarctica: A father and son’s journey to save the planet

Source:  CBS News

Thirty-two years ago, Robert Swan made history as the first person to walk to both poles. Even as a young man, these grueling expeditions took a harsh toll on his body. Passing directly beneath the hole in the ozone layer, Swan’s face became badly burned and his eyes even changed color.

But the Arctic explorer now says that all of that physical duress pales in comparison to the agony of watching his son go through the same experience 32 years later.

This past winter, after years of preparation, Robert Swan set out to trek the 600 miles to the South Pole again — this time, with his 24-year-old son Barney by his side. And this time, with an additional challenge built in: they would survive exclusively off of renewable energy.

It was a “swan song” with a very important goal. If the father-son team could get by on renewable energy in the harshest environment on Earth, then people in the comfort of their own homes could do it too.

Read the story at CBS News. 

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Natalie Portman-produced “Eating Animals” demands we face the truth about factory farming

Natalie Portman-produced “Eating Animals” demands we face the truth about factory farming

Source:  Newsday

Natalie Portman credits “Eating Animals,” Jonathan Safran Foer’s 2009 best-selling book about the moral and environmental implications of factory farming, for converting her to veganism.

The Jericho, New York-raised actress has no illusions, though, that her new documentary adaption of Foer’s book will convert others.

As the producer and narrator of “Eating Animals,” Portman says she hopes the film raises awareness of industrialized agriculture without preaching or proselytizing.

Although the movie is clearly concerned with animal suffering — seen in footage of chickens with deformed legs and cows bleeding from udders — it also points out the environmental impacts of large-scale meat production, notably the water pollution and human ailments that have been linked to pig waste.

If “Eating Animals” offers a solution, though, it isn’t necessarily in widespread veganism or activism, it’s in supporting small farmers who treat their animals humanely and leave a relatively modest footprint on the Earth.

Read the story at Newsday. 

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