“The Great Green Wall” shines a light on one of the world’s most ambitious but unsung initiatives to tackle climate change

“The Great Green Wall” shines a light on one of the world’s most ambitious but unsung initiatives to tackle climate change

Source:  Variety

“Buena Vista Social Club” meets “The Year of Living Dangerously” is how director Jared P. Scott pitches “The Great Green Wall,” an eco-documentary that shines a light on one of the world’s most ambitious but unsung initiatives to tackle climate change.

The film premiered last week at Venice Days, an independent program running alongside the Venice Film Festival.

Executive produced by Fernando Meirelles, the Oscar-nominated director of “City of God” and “The Constant Gardener,” the film focuses on a plan, agreed by 11 African nations in 2007, to plant 8,000 kilometers (4,970 miles) of trees and vegetation across the Sahel, the semi-arid area that stretches the entire width of the continent, just below the Sahara desert.

“The Great Green Wall” will be screened for 150 heads of state at the U.N. Climate Action Summit in New York City on Sept. 23.

Read the story at Variety.


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“Aquarela” is the most metal documentary about water you’ll ever see

“Aquarela” is the most metal documentary about water you’ll ever see

Source:  Vox

Victor Kossakovsy’s “Aquarela” is unlike anything you’ll ever see.  It’s a documentary about water, the role water plays in climates around the world, and how changes in those climates can unleash water’s destructive power.

But none of those themes are narrated in the film.  Instead, we’re presented with about 90 minutes of lengthy scenes and trusted to draw meaning from them — cars falling through melting ice that used to be solid enough to drive across; rolling high seas; icebergs splitting apart; gale-force storms on highways; enormous, breathtaking waterfalls.

Watching the film is less like watching a traditional nature documentary and more like a feature-length music video that roams the globe, without many people onscreen, and no talking heads or explanatory text.

“Aquarela” is playing now in select theaters.

Read the story at Vox.


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Kino Lorber teams with Kanopy for special theatrical run of climate change doc “Anthropocene: The Human Epoch”

Kino Lorber teams with Kanopy for special theatrical run of climate change doc “Anthropocene: The Human Epoch”

Source:  Deadline

Climate change documentary “Anthropocene: The Human Epoch” is just as much a visual marvel as it is a call to action.

Kino Lorber is partnering with streaming platform Kanopy to bring the feature to over 100 theaters nationwide on September 25 to coincide with the U.N. Climate Action Summit and Climate Week NYC.

In addition, the documentary will be available for streaming on Kanopy beginning on January 1, 2020.

Read the story at Deadline.

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Snails in Hawaii are disappearing faster than any other animal on the planet. Meet the scientists fighting for their survival

Snails in Hawaii are disappearing faster than any other animal on the planet. Meet the scientists fighting for their survival

Source:  The Atlantic

Once, snails decorated the forests of Hawaii like Christmas ornaments.  There were more than 750 unique species, which descended from ancestral mollusks that arrived on the islands millions of years ago.  Hawaii’s snails were exemplars of evolution’s generative prowess.

But in recent decades, Hawaii’s snails have become notorious for the opposite force: extinction.  Due to habitat loss and invasive predators, more than half of the snail species on the islands have gone extinct.  Of those that remain, many have only a few dozen members left in their total populations.  Some are endlings, the last of their kind.

Dave Sischo and his team at the Snail Extinction Prevention Program are spearheading the campaign to save Hawaii’s snails. It’s a valiant effort that is facing ever more sobering odds—Hawaii’s snails are disappearing at a faster rate than any other animal on Earth.

Watch “Death of a Species” above and read the story at The Atlantic.

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“I’m not a climate change guy, but…” Farmers face a new reality in the heartland

“I’m not a climate change guy, but…” Farmers face a new reality in the heartland

Source:  CBS News

A historic flood in March 2019 left much of America’s heartland under water.  Particularly hard-hit were Midwestern grain farmers, and climate experts say storms of increasing intensity could be the new normal.

An industry already struggling to bounce back from the trade war with China must now grapple with the realities of climate change that threaten to change the future of farming forever.

Now, some farmers are hoping they can be part of the the solution by implementing practices that could potentially reverse the effects of climate change – and provide a bigger profit.

In the CBSN Originals documentary, “A Climate Reckoning in the Heartland,” Adam Yamaguchi travels to Nebraska, where he meets two farmers on different paths, both determined to pass their legacies on to the next generation.

Watch the short documentary above and read the story at CBS News.

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Netflix orders “Oceans” docuseries from “Blue Planet II” creator

Netflix orders “Oceans” docuseries from “Blue Planet II” creator

Source:  Deadline

Netflix is heading out to sea with the first high-end nature documentary series from its deal with Blue Planet II creator James Honeyborne.  The streaming service has ordered “Oceans” (working title) from his production company Freeborne Media.

The announcement comes after Deadline revealed in January that Netflix had inked a multi-year deal with Honeyborne to produce nature and science series.

While 70% of the globe is covered in water, so little is known about each ocean’s unique characteristics.

Each episode will focus on a different ocean, combining the disciplines of oceanography, geography, and earth sciences to experience these characteristics in new ways.

From the tropical waters of the Indian Ocean, to the raging wildness of the Atlantic Ocean, from the deceptively peaceful waters of the Pacific Ocean that are surrounded by a ring of fire, to the freezing isolation of the Southern and Arctic Oceans – the series will celebrate the diversity of our planet’s greatest habitats through the experiences of the remarkable creatures that live within each one.

Read the story at Deadline.

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