BBC One commissions first primetime film on climate change since 2007

BBC One commissions first primetime film on climate change since 2007

Source:  Carbon Brief

The BBC has commissioned its first primetime film on climate change since 2007. No further details about the film have yet been provided by the BBC. However, Carbon Brief has exclusively obtained more information about the project.

“Two Degrees” is the working title of the 90-minute film, and it’s scheduled to air in a primetime slot on BBC One at the end of March 2019. It will be part of a week-long series of environmentally themed programs.

It will be the first time BBC One has aired a primetime documentary dedicated to the topic of climate change since 2007 when the network aired Sir David Attenborough’s “Climate Change: Britain Under Threat” in January of that year.

Read the story at Carbon Brief.

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Louis Theroux explores life, love, and death in new BBC series “Altered States”

Louis Theroux explores life, love, and death in new BBC series “Altered States”

Source:  Digital Spy

Louis Theroux is back in a brand new three-part documentary series on the BBC.

Titled “Altered States,” Theroux is once again off to America, except this time he isn’t off to interview neo-Nazis or the Westboro Baptist church, although we’re sure he will ruffle some feathers regardless.

That’s because this series will see him cover the topics of adoption, polyamory, and euthanasia.

The first episode looks at the adoption industry which involves a lot of money and a lot of abuse. Episode two sees Theroux talk to people who have experienced the positive and negatives of polyamorous relationships, while the final episode will have him explore the moral and legal complications of euthanasia.

“Louis Theroux’s Altered States” will air later this year on BBC Two.

Read the story at Digital Spy.

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Inquest hopes to provide answers to families torn apart by the Troubles

Inquest hopes to provide answers to families torn apart by the Troubles

Source:  The Independent

The Ballymurphy Massacre at the height of the Troubles is being revisited in a new inquest hearing due to open in September.

Presided over by Justice Siobhan Keegan at Belfast High Court, the hearing hopes to establish precisely want happened during the three-day siege in August 1971 that left 11 civilians dead and bring closure to the families who lost loved ones.

A Channel 4 documentary, “Massacre at Ballymurphy,” directed by Callum Macrae aired over the weekend and revisited the incident in which 600 members of the 1st Battalion, Parachute Regiment of the British Army allegedly came under fire in a residential area of Belfast, Northern Ireland, prompting them to hit back and become engaged in a violent gun battle.

Although no journalists were present to record events and no press footage of their unfolding exists, the soldiers are thought to have been engaged in early morning raids – kicking in doors and dragging citizens from their beds at 5 am, according to local accounts – when the shooting began.

Macrae’s documentary explores the suggestion that British soldiers mistakenly firing on their own men might have been the cause of the massacre.

Read the story at The Independent.

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RTE’s exceptional documentary on the life of John Hume premiered on Irish TV this week

RTE’s exceptional documentary on the life of John Hume premiered on Irish TV this week

Source:  JOE

Following its big screen premiere at the Galway Film Fleadh in July 2017 and a theatrical release in November that same year, “In the Name of Peace: John Hume in America” premiered on Irish TV this week.

The documentary follows the life of the Nobel Peace Prize winner as he worked tirelessly over decades to rally the support of one U.S. President after another to back the peace process in Ireland and was a key agent in the transformation of Northern Ireland – one which valued inclusive peace.

Narrated by Liam Neeson with a score provided by Riverdance composer Bill Whelan, the documentary features interviews with former American Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, British Prime Ministers Tony Blair and John Major, and Taoisigh Bertie Ahern and Enda Kenny.

Read the story at JOE. 

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Lagardere Studios’ Imagissime unveils new slate of international documentaries

Lagardere Studios’ Imagissime unveils new slate of international documentaries

Source:  Variety

Lagardere Studios’ production label, Imagissime, is developing several internationally-driven documentaries, including “The Rise of Modern Cooking” and “Living Under the Third Reich.”

“The Rise of Modern Cooking,” which has been commissioned by Franco-German network, Arte, and is being co-produced with Belgian and Canadian partners, pays homage to Auguste Escoffier — the restaurateur and culinary writer who modernized traditional French cooking methods. The documentary, directed by Olivier Julien, mixes archival, animated, and live-action footage.

Imagissime is also developing “Living Under the Third Reich” with German outfit, Dok Films, a two-part documentary entirely based on archives of color footage shot by ordinary Germany families from 1936, right before the start of WWII, to 1944, a year before the downfall of the Nazi regime and the end of the war. Through the silent footage, audiences will get a glimpse at the rise of Nazism and its impact on everyday life in Germany.

Read the story at Variety. 

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“Manchester: The Night of the Bomb” is a documentary you can watch only with your heart in your throat.

“Manchester: The Night of the Bomb” is a documentary you can watch only with your heart in your throat.

It’s a simple opening, but devastatingly poignant in context: teenage girls talking about getting ready to go to a concert. “I wanted something off the shoulder,” says one. “Like girly, but not girly. Like Ariana Grande.”

It is poignant because, even now, these teenagers are able to recapture that sense of anticipation. It is devastating because you know what is coming next.

In all, 14,000 people attended Grande’s show at the Manchester Arena on 22 May last year. “Manchester: The Night of the Bomb” (BBC Two) recounts the events leading up to, and after, the explosion in the foyer that killed 23 people and wounded more than 500.

It is a documentary you can watch only with your heart in your throat.

Read the story at The Guardian.

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