New documentary includes never-before-seen footage of life in the Warsaw Ghetto

New documentary includes never-before-seen footage of life in the Warsaw Ghetto

Source:  Daily Mail

The Warsaw Ghetto was the largest of its kind in Europe – but the story of its inhabitants has always been told using Nazi footage, until now.

Never-before-seen footage shot by amateur Polish filmmaker Alfons Ziolkowski in 1941 shows what life was like for Jews inside the ghetto – from children smuggling food, to a dying man on the sidewalk, to Nazi guards dishing out beatings.

The 10-minute film is the only known footage of the ghetto that was not recorded by Nazis, and provides an invaluable historical record of the Jewish experience there.

The rare footage is included in Eric Bednarski’s hour-long documentary “Warsaw: A City Divided.”

“Warsaw: A City Divided” premiered earlier this month in Warsaw, Poland at the 16th annual Millennium Docs Against Gravity Film Festival.

Read the story at the Daily Mail.

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A Scottish teenager navigates hardship upon hardship in harrowing non-fiction feature “Scheme Birds”

A Scottish teenager navigates hardship upon hardship in harrowing non-fiction feature “Scheme Birds”

Source:  Variety

“I don’t run away from nothing, I run to it,” says Gemma, the quietly resilient teenager at the center of “Scheme Birds.”

Few would blame her for doing the reverse, having been abandoned in infanthood by her parents in the harsh projects of Motherwell, a deprived, lusterless Scottish town a few miles outside Glasgow.

It’s a home that does little to reward her loyalty, yet at the outset, at least, there’s nowhere Gemma would rather be.  Admitting that she expects to spend her whole life in this deprived corner of Motherwell, she then breaks sunnily with glum kitchen-sink tradition by saying she hopes never to leave.

That will change, as will many aspects of her life, by the end of Ellen Fiske and Ellinor Hallin’s superb documentary, an alternately lyrical and gut-punching coming-of-age study in which girls like Gemma become women — and wounded women at that — altogether too soon.

“Scheme Birds,” recently won the top prize in the Best Documentary Feature category at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Read the story at Variety.

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David Attenborough talks climate change in BBC One special

David Attenborough talks climate change in BBC One special

Source:  New Scientist

Global warming will enjoy a rare moment in the UK spotlight when the BBC airs a one-hour film on the subject on April 18.

“Right now, we’re facing our gravest threat in thousands of years: climate change,” says narrator David Attenborough at the start of “Climate Change – The Facts.”

The involvement of the influential Attenborough on BBC One, the corporation’s biggest channel, in a prime 9:00 pm slot has raised expectations that the film could significantly shift attitudes and spur action.

It could perhaps do for climate change what 2017’s “Blue Planet II” did for plastics.

“Climate Change – The Facts” is an excellent primer on climate change, sprinting through the basics of the science, why we have failed to cut carbon emissions, and how we might reduce future warming.

The film features a who’s who from climate academia, including Michael Mann, James Hansen, and Naomi Oreskes from the U.S. to Peter Stott, Mark Maslin, and Catherine Mitchell from the UK.

Read the story at New Scientist.

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Groundbreaking 1994 doc “Tasting Freedom” exposed the abuse of refugees in the UK

Groundbreaking 1994 doc “Tasting Freedom” exposed the abuse of refugees in the UK

Source:  Dazed

“All this abuse was happening all the time, unreported… so we wanted to provoke the national debate.” Filmmaker Ken Fero spoke with Dazed through his 1994 documentary “Tasting Freedom” from a room in Regents University, where he now teaches.

After an award-winning career as a documentarian, activist, and lecturer (“Germany – The Other Story” (1991), “Sweet France ” (1992), “Injustice ” (2001)), he’s reflecting on the egregious language of today’s hostile environment and how much the UK’s immigration agenda causes him shame.

It’s been 25 years since “Tasting Freedom,” a searing exposé into the brutality of the UK’s demonisation of asylum seekers, was made.  The final shot, which sees a group of detainees on a roof, fenced off, protesting via a hunger strike as they shout “freedom!”, is an image that has been referenced in activist circles and filmmakers throughout the years since.

The film, which focuses on first-hand accounts from Algerian and Zairean conflict refugees in detention, has echoes of our current moment of “crisis” regarding refugees in 2019.

Watch “Tasting Freedom” on Vimeo.

Read the story at Dazed.

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Watch the first trailer for Louis Theroux’s latest documentary “The Night In Question”

Watch the first trailer for Louis Theroux’s latest documentary “The Night In Question”

Source:  JOE

Having moved to America for his recent three-part documentary series “Altered States,” Louis Theroux is back with another unflinching look at U.S. society.

“The Night in Question” finds Theroux heading to U.S. college campuses where he meets victims of sexual assault.

Theroux also interviews alleged perpetrators who believe their reputations have been tarnished by these claims.

“The Night in Question” premieres March 4 on BBC Two.

Read the story at JOE.

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“Delphine and Carole” (“Delphine et Carole, insoumuses”) chronicles Delphine Seyrig’s fight for women’s rights both off the screen and behind the camera

“Delphine and Carole” (“Delphine et Carole, insoumuses”) chronicles Delphine Seyrig’s fight for women’s rights both off the screen and behind the camera

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

Known outside of France for her roles in film classics like “Last Year at Marienbad,” “Stolen Kisses,” and “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie,” the late actress Delphine Seyrig was, along with Catherine Deneuve, Jeanne Moreau, and Anna Karina, one of the great female talents to emerge at the birth of the Nouvelle Vague.

But perhaps unbeknownst to most was Seyrig’s involvement, beginning in the late 1960s, with the French feminist movement, for which she became one of its leading celebrity voices during the latter part of her career.

That part of the actress’s life is revealed with considerable detail in “Delphine and Carole” (“Delphine et Carole, insoumuses”), a documentary from director Callisto McNulty that explores how Seyrig and filmmaker Carole Roussopoulos joined forces to make a handful of protest movies, using the new medium of video that became available in the 1970s.

“Delphine and Carole (Delphine et Carole, insoumuses)” made its world premiere at this year’s Berlin International Film Festival. 

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.

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