BBC Stories presents “The Instagram Suicide Network”

BBC Stories presents “The Instagram Suicide Network”

Source:  BBC Stories on YouTube

A BBC investigation based on the phone of a 17-year-old Norwegian teenager who killed herself has revealed the shocking scale of self-harm and suicide material being shared on private Instagram accounts.

The BBC was able to see inside the mobile phone of the Norwegian teen – who live posted her suicide on Instagram.

New analysis by a team of Norwegian journalists at NRK has revealed that the Norwegian teenager was linked to another 1,000 accounts from around the world all posting similar dangerous content.

At least another 14 girls in the same Instagram network have also taken their own lives.

Watch “The Instagram Suicide Network” above and read the story at BBC Stories on YouTube.


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“The Eulogy” recounts the life and lonely death of one of Australia’s greatest pianists

“The Eulogy” recounts the life and lonely death of one of Australia’s greatest pianists

Source:  The Conversation

How could one of the greatest pianists that Australia has ever produced die lonely, neglected, and impoverished in a dilapidated house in suburban Melbourne?

“The Eulogy,” a documentary written and directed by Janine Hosking examines the life, career, and tragic death of Australian concert pianist Geoffrey Tozer, who passed away in 2009 at the age of 54 from liver disease.

The film begins with former Australian prime minister Paul Keating reading the now-infamous eulogy he delivered at Tozer’s memorial a decade ago.  The speech, which starts out as a celebration of the pianist’s life and achievements, culminates in an attack on Australia’s cultural establishment.

Keating speaks of the arts in Australia as riven with “bitchiness and preference” and “inverted snobbery.”  He accuses the Melbourne and Sydney Symphony Orchestras of treating Tozer with “indifference and contempt” and suggests the people “who had charge in the selection of artists during this period should hang their heads in shame.”

“The Eulogy” made its world premiere at this year’s Melbourne International Film Festival.

Read the story at The Conversation.


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“Kabul, City in the Wind” examines life in a city where bombs, rockets, and hand grenades can suddenly end it

“Kabul, City in the Wind” examines life in a city where bombs, rockets, and hand grenades can suddenly end it

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

For viewers who know Afghanistan only through war scenes on TV or films about blue-veiled women in burkhas, the impressionistic documentary “Kabul, City in the Wind” will feel like a melancholy poem about a half-forgotten dream.

The resonant film captures the elusive feeling of the city better than others, through the interaction of real people and an unreal landscape that appears and disappears in the blowing dust.

“Kabul, City in the Wind” is a quiet film about ordinary life in a place where bombs, rockets, and hand grenades can suddenly end it.

Aboozar Amini’s feature-length debut won the Afghanistan-born, European-educated director the 2018 IDFA special jury award for First Appearance, ushering in a long festival career.  It’s a natural continuation of his short films and student work like “Angelus Novus” and “Where is Kurdistan?” which centered on the Middle East.

“Kabul, City in the Wind” recently screened at the El Gouna Film Festival in Egypt.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.


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“Unmasked: Makeup’s Big Secret” exposes the beauty industry’s big environmental secret

“Unmasked: Makeup’s Big Secret” exposes the beauty industry’s big environmental secret

Source:  Refinery29

Thanks to the wider conversation about plastic waste, the beauty industry’s environmental impact has been called into question over the past few years.  While excessive packaging is obvious to spot and tangibly changed, what about the ingredients hiding in the products in your bathroom?

Case in point: palm oil.  In a new BBC Three documentary, “Unmasked: Makeup’s Big Secret,” that aired earlier this month,  Emmy Burbidge, a makeup artist from southwest England, travels to Papua New Guinea to see the damage done by this ingredient.

While it’s widely documented that palm oil is terrible news for the planet, less known is that it’s used in a whopping 70% of cosmetic products, primarily as an emulsifier and surfactant.

The beauty industry therefore has a part to play in the deforestation caused by palm oil production that’s said to have destroyed 8% of the world’s forests between 1990 and 2008.

Watch “Unmasked: Makeup’s Big Secret” above and read the story at Refinery29.


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“Follow the Beatles” goes behind the scenes of “A Hard Day’s Night”

“Follow the Beatles” goes behind the scenes of “A Hard Day’s Night”

Source:  Ultimate Classic Rock

On August 3, 1964, a month after “A Hard Day’s Night” helped the world fall even more in love with the Beatles, the BBC offered their rabid fans a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the Fab Four’s film debut with “Follow the Beatles.”

The Robert Robinson-narrated documentary showed off even more of the Beatles’ charming and witty personalities, and revealed some interesting insights and perspectives on the making of the film classic.

Watch “Follow the Beatles” at BitChute.

Read the story at Ultimate Classic Rock.

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“The Cordillera of Dreams” turns the Andes into a metaphor for Chile’s history of political oppression

“The Cordillera of Dreams” turns the Andes into a metaphor for Chile’s history of political oppression

Source:  Hyperallergic

“I have always felt that time passes more slowly in Chile,” says Patricio Guzmán early in “The Cordillera of Dreams” (La Cordillera de los Sueños), which premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

The latest film by the Chilean-born, Paris-based director is positioned as the final installment in a trilogy that also includes his late-career triumphs “Nostalgia for the Light” (Nostalgia de la Luz, 2010) and “The Pearl Button” (El Botón de Nácar, 2015).

Like them, “The Cordillera of Dreams” uses Chile’s natural beauty as a starting point for a reflection on the country’s past and present, including the scars of Augusto Pinochet’s 17-year dictatorship and its attendant murders, disappearances, and forced exiles.

Working with an essayist blend of original and archival footage, interviews, and voiceover, the film is explicitly concerned with the passage of time, and how such distance serves to both forestall justice for the crimes of the past and risk supporting their reemergence.

“The Cordillera of Dreams” is currently awaiting theatrical release.  “Nostalgia for the Light” and “The Pearl Button” are available on Amazon Prime Video and iTunes.

Read the story at Hyperallergic.

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