Watch Martin Scorsese’s long-lost 1970 documentary “Street Scenes”

Watch Martin Scorsese’s long-lost 1970 documentary “Street Scenes”

Source:  /Film

Martin Scorsese has “The Irishman” premiering at the New York Film Festival this week, but if you want to jump further back (much further back) into his career, you’ve come to the right place.

“Street Scenes,” a long-lost 1970 documentary the legendary filmmaker directed, has finally resurfaced.

The film documents two different protests against the Vietnam War, one in New York City and another in Washington, D.C.

Scorsese worked on the film with fellow NYU students, including Oliver Stone who was one of the camera operators.

Watch “Street Scenes” above or on YouTube.

Read the story at /Film.


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New Depeche Mode documentary “Spirits in the Trees” gets one-night worldwide theatrical release

New Depeche Mode documentary “Spirits in the Trees” gets one-night worldwide theatrical release

Source:  Variety

Depeche Mode has reunited with the group’s long-time filmographer, Anton Corbjn, for a combination documentary/concert film, “Spirits in the Forest,” which Trafalgar Releasing has announced it will put on approximately 2,400 screens worldwide for one night on Nov. 21.

The film documents performance footage from the Berlin dates of Depeche Mode’s 115-date Global Spirit Tour of 2017, with an additional documentary wrinkle.  A statement about the film describes it as “diving into the deeply emotional stories of six special Depeche Mode fans” between concert clips.

The documentary follows in the footsteps of Corbijn’s previous feature-length looks at the band, including “Depeche Mode: Alive in Berlin” (2014), “Depeche Mode: One Night in Paris” (2002), and “Depeche Mode: Devotional” (1993).

Read the story at Variety.


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Slam poetry doc “Don’t Be Nice” follows artists finding their own voices

Slam poetry doc “Don’t Be Nice” follows artists finding their own voices

Source:  TheWrap

School spelling bees have often been fodder for documentaries — young people trying to control their sweaty palms, navigate the overwhelming pressure of academic competition, and, if they’re lucky, develop a sense of self along the way.

But many of these films perpetuate a desire to succeed that often excludes black and Latino adolescents.  That’s what makes “Don’t Be Nice” such an interesting watch.

The debut feature from director Max Powers (known for his editing work in films like “Alone Together” and “Big Cheat”) has nothing to do with being able to spell SAT words for cash prizes, but rather using words in a similar competition setting to empower the oppressed.

The film centers a group of young black and Latino adults who make up the Bowery Slam Poetry Team in New York City,

Unlike the spelling bees in other films, there doesn’t seem to be a monetary incentive as the team enters regional and national slam poetry contests, performing work that is equal parts confrontational and moving.

“Don’t Be Nice” opens in select theaters on September 20.

Read the story at TheWrap.


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Ken Burns’ “Country Music” premieres tonight on PBS

Ken Burns’ “Country Music” premieres tonight on PBS

Source:  The Oregonian

In his previous documentary series “The Vietnam War,” “Baseball,” “Jazz,” and “The Civil War,” filmmaker Ken Burns has dug deep into American history, shedding light on dark places and celebrating moments of triumph.

The eight-part, 16-hour “Country Music,” has all the earnestness that is Burns’ trademark.  But in telling the story of this American art form, the director and his collaborators, including writer Dayton Duncan and producer Julie Dunfey, have made possibly the most upbeat work of Burns’ career.

In place of somber tales of deadly battles, divisive racial politics and discrimination found in his other documentaries, much of “Country Music” is a toe-tapping celebration of legendary performers and, above all else, the enduring songs they wrote and made famous.

“Country Music” premieres tonight on PBS.

Read the story at The Oregonian.


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New Harvey Weinstein documentary reveals how the former movie mogul thought he was “Untouchable”

New Harvey Weinstein documentary reveals how the former movie mogul thought he was “Untouchable”

Source:  USA Today

Harvey Weinstein is back in the movies, only this time, he’s not the one calling the shots.

The disgraced movie mogul is the subject of “Untouchable,” a new documentary that premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival, where activist Rose McGowan has accused him of sexually assaulting her more than 20 years ago.

Although McGowan herself does not appear in “Untouchable,” the film features nearly a dozen other testimonies from women who have accused Weinstein of sexual assault, including actresses Rosanna Arquette and Paz de la Huerta, who have been at the forefront of the #MeToo movement.

“Untouchable” is available now on Hulu.

Read the story at USA Today.


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“The Miracle of the Little Prince” explores how the classic story has helped keep several esoteric languages alive

“The Miracle of the Little Prince” explores how the classic story has helped keep several esoteric languages alive

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

Don’t be fooled by the title of filmmaker Marjoleine Boonstra’s documentary.

Yes, “The Miracle of the Little Prince” does revolve around Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s novel “The Little Prince,” which has been embraced by readers all over the world since it was published in 1943.

But the chief subject matter of the film currently receiving its U.S. theatrical premiere at New York City’s Film Forum is languages; specifically, the threatened disappearance of many of them.

Boonstra works from the fact that the novel has been translated into approximately 375 languages (more, the doc informs us, than any book except the Bible) and explores how many translators have used it to help keep their native tongues alive.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.