“Life in the Doghouse” profiles a couple who have rescued 11,000 dogs since Hurricane Katrina

“Life in the Doghouse” profiles a couple who have rescued 11,000 dogs since Hurricane Katrina

Source:  Gambit

The day that director Ron Davis visited Danny Robertshaw and Ron Danta to adopt a dog from their rescue in 2016, he left with two surprises — a Chihuahua he later named Little Guy and the idea to make a documentary about the couple behind the rescue of more than 11,000 dogs since Hurricane Katrina.

Before Davis left, he told them, “I’m going to make a movie about you.  I don’t even know anything about you. But I trust my instincts, and there’s plenty behind all this.”

Initally released in September 2018, interest in Robertshaw and Danta’s dog rescue organization, Danny & Ron’s Rescue, has significantly increased folllowing the film’s debut on Netflix last month.

“Life in the Doghouse is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Gambit.

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Get a look at the real world of “The Lion King” in new Discovery series “Serengeti”

Get a look at the real world of “The Lion King” in new Discovery series “Serengeti”

Source:  PEOPLE

While we’re used to watching fictional representations of the wild, filled with talking animals, Discovery Channel’s new nature documentary series is all real — and drama-packed.

“Serengeti” is a six-part series that will take viewers into the plains of Tanzania to see what it’s like to live as lion, zebra, baboon, and cheetah in a habitat that’s relatively untouched by humans.

Viewers will meet creatures like Kali, a lioness struggling to raise her cubs on her own, and Tembo, a young male elephant taking the next step on his journey to adulthood.

The series was created and produced by Emmy-winner Simon Fuller and directed and produced by Emmy-winning wildlife filmmaker John Downer.

Academy Award winner Lupita Nyong’o narrates the series.

“Serengeti” premieres August 4 on the Discovery Channel.

Read the story at PEOPLE.

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“Pariah Dog” profiles four people who selflessly care for the stray dogs of Kolkata

“Pariah Dog” profiles four people who selflessly care for the stray dogs of Kolkata

Source:  Scroll.in

Nearly every city in India has packs of stray dogs who scour the landscape for scraps and head pats.  And nearly every Indian city has kindly spirits who regularly feed the dogs, tend to their injuries, and give them names and a sense of belonging.

Filmmaker Jesse Alk’s documentary “Pariah Dog” is an absorbing chronicle of one such group of people of canine caretakers in Kolkata.

Unfettered love and uninterrupted dedication link the stories of the aristocratic woman who has fallen on bad times, the artist who dreams of buying a plot of land on which he can house the dogs, the auto rickshaw driver who competes on TV game shows, and the unmarried domestic worker who all have dedicated their lives to the dogs.

“Pariah Dog” recently screened at DocFest in San Francisco.

Read the story at Scroll.in.

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Bred to be shot: Inside America’s exotic hunting industry

Bred to be shot: Inside America’s exotic hunting industry

Source:  CBS News

Texas is the epicenter of the exotic animal industry in the U.S.

5 Star Outfitters is one of the many hundreds of hunting ranches in Texas that stock their grounds with exotic animals like the wildebeest.

There’s no official count, but some estimates place the number of such exotic hunting ranches in the thousands.  According to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, which has oversight over hunts in the state, an exotic animal is defined as any animal that isn’t indigenous to Texas.

“The domestic wildlife trade is the dirty underbelly of trophy hunting industry,” said Kitty Block, CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, an animal welfare group that opposes the practice.

Block described the hunting of exotics in the U.S. as canned hunts, motivated by the desire to obtain a so-called trophy.

“Animals are fenced-in, hand-reared, hand-fed, and they’re baited so food is out when hunters come,” Block told CBS News.  “Hunters are then driven up to the area where animal is eating and they’re shot there.”

Watch Trophy Hunting: Killing or Conservation?” above and read the story at CBS News.

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The Smithsonian Channel dives into “Russia’s Wild Sea”

The Smithsonian Channel dives into “Russia’s Wild Sea”

Source:  Realscreen

The Smithsonian Channel is prepping a two-part documentary on the Sea of Okhotsk, one of the world’s richest and most dangerous seas.

“Russia’s Wild Sea” explores the wildlife and environment of the sea, located 4,000 miles from Moscow in the far east of Russia, as well as the ingenious adaptations that make life possible in the region despite its many hardships.

Director Franz Hafner and his crew were granted full access to the region, which required arriving by plane and exploring by ship, as no roads reach the shores of the sea.

“Russia’s Wild Sea” premieres June 5 on the Smithsonian Channel with part two airing on June 12.

Watch the trailer and read the story at Realscreen.

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“The Dog Doc” profiles Marty Goldstein, a veterinarian practicing holistic medicine

“The Dog Doc” profiles Marty Goldstein, a veterinarian practicing holistic medicine

Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

Both interpretations of the film’s title, “The Dog Doc,” are accurate.  It’s a canine-centric documentary (with a few cats as background players), and it’s a portrait of veterinarian, Marty Goldstein.

Director Cindy Meehl has crafted an admiring portrait, to be sure, but one that also poses penetrating questions about what passes for health care today in the United States, for people and their pets alike.

At the center of the film is Goldstein’s veterinary practice in upstate New York that’s devoted to lost-cause pets, those with dire diagnoses or unexplained symptoms.

Instead of invasive surgery and pharmaceutical regimens,  Goldstein and his three female colleagues practice integrative veterinary medicine, which combines such alternative therapies as homeopathy and acupuncture with conventional medicine.

That this approach, in 2019, is still considered by many in the medical field to be unusual is amazing.  So too is the fact that immune-system support and nutrition aren’t curriculum topics for most veterinary and medical students.

Goldstein, who’s been swimming against the medical tide for 45 years, may be quietly exasperated, but the film makes its points by demonstrating the effects of his care.

“The Dog Doc” recently screened at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.

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