Season 38 of NATURE kicks off October 2 on PBS

Season 38 of NATURE kicks off October 2 on PBS

Source:  NATURE

Season 38 of NATURE on PBS kicks off on October 2 with “Octopus: Making Contact” and continues through the spring of 2020 with new episodes providing an awe-inspiring look into the lives of a diverse group of wildlife.

Catch a sneak peek of a few of the upcoming episodes in the season preview above.

Read the story at NATURE.


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“Serengeti” reveals the inner lives of animals and outer beauty of Tanzania

“Serengeti” reveals the inner lives of animals and outer beauty of Tanzania

Source:  Film Threat

Discovery’s latest hit “Serengeti” follows the varied wildlife for one year in one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Africa.

But first, here’s a quick geography lesson for context.  The Serengeti ecosystem is in northern Tanzania lays claim to the second-largest terrestrial mammal migration on the planet. Its approximately 18,500 miles houses swamps, grasslands, and woods, amongst other habitats.

While the animals are all given names, they don’t have a distinct voice.  Instead, “Serengeti” is narrated by Oscar winner Lupita Nyong’o as the spirit of the Serengeti.

It doesn’t matter if she’s talking about the lioness taking on some zebras or the hurt pride of a baboon, the narration is always “we,” “us,” and so forth.  This works very well, as it still humanizes the wildlife but never turns them into a cartoon.

Nyong’o breathes life into her voiceover so that the personal stakes of each story feels as grand as the setting.

“Serengeti” is available now on Discovery.

Read the story at Film Threat.

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Would you swim with polar bears for the perfect photo? Amos Nachoum does

Would you swim with polar bears for the perfect photo? Amos Nachoum does

Source:  San Francisco Chronicle

In an early scene in the new documentary “Picture of His Life,” Amos Nachoum sits alone in a dark San Francisco studio projecting slides on the wall.

Nachoum, one of the world’s most accomplished wildlife and underwater photographers, clicks slowly through highlights of a 40-year career dedicated to his lifelong fascination with the planet’s most fearsome and formidable creatures.

There he is, Nikon in hand, crouched on the ice just steps from massive tusked walruses, or snapping his famous photo of an Antarctic leopard seal about to devour a small penguin and, most audaciously, swimming just body lengths away from a great white shark.

Each scene is representative of Nachoum’s trademark, controversial approach — going into the water without the protection of a cage and positioning himself face-to-face with the ocean’s apex predators.

“Picture of His Life” recently screened at the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival.

Read the story at the San Francisco Chronicle.

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“Life in the Doghouse” profiles a couple who have rescued 11,000 dogs since Hurricane Katrina

“Life in the Doghouse” profiles a couple who have rescued 11,000 dogs since Hurricane Katrina

Source:  Gambit

The day that director Ron Davis visited Danny Robertshaw and Ron Danta to adopt a dog from their rescue in 2016, he left with two surprises — a Chihuahua he later named Little Guy and the idea to make a documentary about the couple behind the rescue of more than 11,000 dogs since Hurricane Katrina.

Before Davis left, he told them, “I’m going to make a movie about you.  I don’t even know anything about you. But I trust my instincts, and there’s plenty behind all this.”

Initally released in September 2018, interest in Robertshaw and Danta’s dog rescue organization, Danny & Ron’s Rescue, has significantly increased folllowing the film’s debut on Netflix last month.

“Life in the Doghouse is available now on Netflix.

Read the story at Gambit.

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“Pariah Dog” profiles four people who selflessly care for the stray dogs of Kolkata

“Pariah Dog” profiles four people who selflessly care for the stray dogs of Kolkata

Source:  Scroll.in

Nearly every city in India has packs of stray dogs who scour the landscape for scraps and head pats.  And nearly every Indian city has kindly spirits who regularly feed the dogs, tend to their injuries, and give them names and a sense of belonging.

Filmmaker Jesse Alk’s documentary “Pariah Dog” is an absorbing chronicle of one such group of people of canine caretakers in Kolkata.

Unfettered love and uninterrupted dedication link the stories of the aristocratic woman who has fallen on bad times, the artist who dreams of buying a plot of land on which he can house the dogs, the auto rickshaw driver who competes on TV game shows, and the unmarried domestic worker who all have dedicated their lives to the dogs.

“Pariah Dog” recently screened at DocFest in San Francisco.

Read the story at Scroll.in.

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Bred to be shot: Inside America’s exotic hunting industry

Bred to be shot: Inside America’s exotic hunting industry

Source:  CBS News

Texas is the epicenter of the exotic animal industry in the U.S.

5 Star Outfitters is one of the many hundreds of hunting ranches in Texas that stock their grounds with exotic animals like the wildebeest.

There’s no official count, but some estimates place the number of such exotic hunting ranches in the thousands.  According to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, which has oversight over hunts in the state, an exotic animal is defined as any animal that isn’t indigenous to Texas.

“The domestic wildlife trade is the dirty underbelly of trophy hunting industry,” said Kitty Block, CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, an animal welfare group that opposes the practice.

Block described the hunting of exotics in the U.S. as canned hunts, motivated by the desire to obtain a so-called trophy.

“Animals are fenced-in, hand-reared, hand-fed, and they’re baited so food is out when hunters come,” Block told CBS News.  “Hunters are then driven up to the area where animal is eating and they’re shot there.”

Watch Trophy Hunting: Killing or Conservation?” above and read the story at CBS News.

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