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Source:  The New York Times

“Blue Note Records: Beyond The Notes” makes a point right off that the influential jazz label is still very much a thing of the present.

The opening scene shows a convocation of young musicians, including pianist Robert Glasper and trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, assembling in a studio.  Don Was, the musician and producer who now oversees the label, talks up a “Blue Note All-Stars” session.

In time the younger players are joined by legends Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter, surviving alumni of what jazz aficionados would term the label’s third golden age, that of the 1960s.

Francis Wolff and Alfred Lion, German jazz fans who fled Nazi Germany and landed in New York, founded the label in 1939.  It soon developed a roster, including Thelonious Monk, that gave it cachet and a signature sound.

Sophie Huber’s “Blue Note Records: Beyond The Notes” arrives in select theaters this summer.

Read the story at The New York Times.

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