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Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

Eloquently combining intimate personal viewpoints, including the filmmaker’s own, with an incisive historical perspective, psychiatrist-turned-filmmaker Kenneth Paul Rosenberg’s “Bedlam” is a haunting and trenchant look at failed public policy.

The potent film traces what one expert calls a 150-year-old disaster: how little true progress American society has made when it comes to treating people with severe mental illness.

Once warehoused in nightmarish institutions, over the past decades they’ve been relegated instead to hospital emergency rooms, prisons, and the streets — places that Rosenberg’s documentary explores over a five-year period.

The picture that emerges as he follows ER doctors and nurses and a handful of mental health patients, zeroing in on Los Angeles as the epicenter of today’s crisis, is heart-wrenching for everyone involved.

Rosenberg and his editor, Jim Cricchi, have deftly orchestrated the interviews and footage — astute camerawork from a team led by DP Joan Churchill — with affecting archival material, and a few well-deployed title cards offer clear and concise definitions of such conditions as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

“Bedlam” is screening at the Sundance Film Festival.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter.

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