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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  Vox

Victor Kossakovsy’s “Aquarela” is unlike anything you’ll ever see.  It’s a documentary about water, the role water plays in climates around the world, and how changes in those climates can unleash water’s destructive power.

But none of those themes are narrated in the film.  Instead, we’re presented with about 90 minutes of lengthy scenes and trusted to draw meaning from them — cars falling through melting ice that used to be solid enough to drive across; rolling high seas; icebergs splitting apart; gale-force storms on highways; enormous, breathtaking waterfalls.

Watching the film is less like watching a traditional nature documentary and more like a feature-length music video that roams the globe, without many people onscreen, and no talking heads or explanatory text.

“Aquarela” is playing now in select theaters.

Read the story at Vox.


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