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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  IndieWire

At the conclusion of Freida Lee Mock’s 2014 documentary “Anita,” gender inequality crusader and Clarence Thomas accuser Anita Hill offers a glimpse at the bright future she’s long worked toward.

“We really have been building on an understanding of what equality means, whether we fight to gender equality or racial equality or equal rights based on sexual identity,” Hill says. “We have a much better understanding of what it takes to get there in 2011 or 2012 than we had in 1991.”

It’s an upbeat, forward-thinking end to a film often riddled with painful memories for both Hill and its audience.

Just four years later, that optimism has been replaced by an uneasy deja vu.

Next week, it’s expected that both Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who accused him of sexual assault during their high school years, will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Now, Mock’s documentary takes on a new urgency, providing a window into what happened nearly three decades ago and how little things have changed.

Read the story at IndieWire.

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