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Source:  The Hollywood Reporter

“Is it possible to forgive?”

That question, asked in Ofra Bloch’s “Afterward,” feels particularly relevant in these politically charged times seemingly marked more than ever by hatred and resentments.

In his cinematic debut, the Jerusalem-born therapist, described as a “trauma expert,” delves into the feelings of Israelis, Palestinians, and Germans bearing under the weight of psychic wounds, both first-hand and generational. The documentary, which recently received its world premiere at DOC NYC, is very much a film of its time, but its relevance will sadly probably never lessen.

The film deals with the continuing trauma engendered by the Holocaust and the Nakba, the latter term referring to the displacement of hundred of thousands of Palestinians who became forced refugees in 1948. The Nazi legacy is still deeply felt in Germany, where Bloch interviews a former neo-Nazi who can’t quite believe he’s talking amiably to a Jew, and the children of SS officers grappling with the horrors of their fathers’ pasts.

Bloch became introduced to memories of the Holocaust at an early age, having grown up in a Jerusalem home located directly across from the building where Adolf Eichmann was tried for war crimes.

Read the story at The Hollywood Reporter. 

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