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Source:  Hyperallergic

Afghan filmmaker Hassan Fazili once ran the Art Cafe in Kabul, a space for local artists to congregate and socialize.

Among other works, he directed “Peace in Afghanistan,” a documentary that profiled onetime Taliban commander Tur Jan, who abandoned the group and forsook violence.  Not long after the film aired on Afghan television, the Taliban killed Tur Jan and put out a bounty for Fazili.

Fazili, his wife Fatima, and their two young daughters fled for Tajikistan, where they spent more than a year unsuccessfully petitioning various countries for asylum.

Facing deportation to Afghanistan, the family began a new, unusual film project: They turned their phone cameras on one another in order to capture their situation.

For over two years, they filmed themselves on their journey to Europe, documenting each step of their search for a safe place.

The result, “Midnight Traveler,” premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival.

Read the story at Hyperallergic.

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