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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  TIME

The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst (2015) – If you haven’t seen “The Jinx”—or read about its revelations in the news—you need to watch this docuseries. The six-part series explores the life of a wealthy man implicated in the disappearance of his wife, the murder of a family friend, and the death of a neighbor. The final episode of “The Jinx” nearly broke the internet and with good reason.

Available on HBO. 

The Staircase (2005) – This 2005 documentary series by French filmmaker Jean-Xavier de Lestrade is often held up as one of the best examples of the genre. Novelist Michael Peterson becomes the center of a criminal investigation after his wife is found dead at the bottom of a staircase at their home. Lestrade never tries to solve the murder, but rather examines how the criminal justice system treats Peterson. Lestrade added two more episodes to the original eight in 2013 and another three earlier this year.

Available on Netflix. 

“Paradise Lost” Trilogy (1996) – In three movies (made in 1996, 2000 and 2011), the filmmakers follow the courtroom drama surrounding three teenage boys—Damien Echols, Jessie Misskelley, Jr., and Jason Baldwin, known as the West Memphis Three—accused of killing three eight-year-old boys. The trilogy was one of the first documentary series to have a major real-life impact on a trial.

Available on Amazon Prime. 

Wild Wild Country (2018) – “Wild Wild Country” veers from the structure of most traditional true crime series by examining a cult that moves from India to Oregon. Before the cult’s leaders are accused of criminal behavior, it’s one of the rare docuseries that lends sympathy to both sides, in this case members of the cult and their unhappy new neighbors. A true pop culture phenomenon, the series catapulted an esoteric cult into the mainstream.

Available on Netflix.

There’s Something Wrong With Aunt Diane (2011) – A mom drives the wrong way on the highway and causes an accident that kills eight people, including herself, her daughter, and her three nieces. After medical reports claimed that Diane Schuler had alcohol and drugs in her system at the time of the crash, director Liz Garbus investigates alternative scenarios.

Available on HBO.

See the rest of the list at TIME. 

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