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Source:  The Washington Post

Is there anyone among us who isn’t familiar with the tragic trajectory of Whitney Houston?

Born to gospel music royalty, a child prodigy whose voice and graceful demeanor propelled her into superstar status as pop’s reigning diva, Houston ultimately died alone in a bathtub at 48, after years of abusing cocaine.

That grievous arc is drawn with intelligence and sensitivity in “Whitney,” Kevin Macdonald’s documentary that portrays Houston as an artist, a cultural phenomenon and, in the end, a victim of unscrupulous and abusive family members as well as a trainwreck-addicted tabloid culture.

Like 2015’s “Amy,” about Amy Winehouse, “Whitney” threatens to be another formulaic rise and fall tale of a little girl lost to her own self-destructive impulses.

But, like that film, “Whitney” transcends the conventions of the form, delivering a powerful reminder of the breathtaking talent she possessed and the monumental future that was squandered on the altar of selfishness and greed.

Read the story at The Washington Post. 

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