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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  Vanity Fair

“I don’t think the Rajneeshees’ intentions were to come to Oregon and be a cult and poison 750 people,” says Maclain Way, enumerating just two of the illicit actions detailed in the much-buzzed about “Wild Wild Country,” the Netflix documentary series he directed with his brother, Chapman.

Via archival news footage and contemporary eyewitness accounts, the siblings’ true-crime tale lays out the labyrinthine story that unfolded when silent, Rolls-Royce-loving mystic Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and thousands of his maroon-clad, enlightenment-seeking disciples descended on sleepy Antelope, Oregon in the 1980s.

Since the series landed on the streaming service in mid-March, it’s become something of a pop culture phenomenon, the latest opportunity for voyeurs to absorb an improbable, shocking, and sprawling true crime tale. (Readers who have yet to make their way fully into obsession, be forewarned: spoilers ahead.)

Read the story at Vanity Fair.

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