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Source:  Variety

Perhaps the most important question asked at this year’s Morelia International Film Festival in Mexico was made by a young teacher in the Impulso Morelia pix-in-post program doc, “Ayotzinapa, the Turtle’s Pace.”

“Since when is it more dangerous to be a rural teacher than a drug-trafficker?”

The question has been asked constantly in Guerrero, Mexico since Sept. 26, 2014. On that night, five buses of students from a local teaching college, on their way to Mexico City to commemorate the anniversary of the 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre, were redirected to Iguala, a nearby city.

Once they arrived, local authorities laid siege to the buses and opened fire on the unarmed students. When the sun rose the next day three were dead and 43 were missing.

The night’s events have had countless official explanations by local and federal governments alike. Investigations have been conducted and findings presented, but the documentary is the first time that the story is being told from the point of view of those who experienced it, and the friends and family of those who were taken.

Read the story at Variety.

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