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Social Issues   |   World   |   Environment   |   Politics   |   Health and Science   |   Religion and Spirituality   |   True Crime   |   History    |   Arts and Entertainment   |  Sports   |   Technology   |   Animal Kingdom   |    Money   |   Lifestyle   |   BBC and Foreign   |   Industry

Source:  Paste

The Up Series (1964- ) – In 1964, some British filmmakers rounded up a group of fourteen seven-year-old kids from across the country—boys and girls, rich and poor, black and white—and interviewed them for a BBC program called “Seven Up.” Director Michael Apted, a researcher on the first installment, has revisited the same bunch every seven years since.

Born into Brothels (2004) – Zana Briski was working as a documentary photographer in Calcutta when she began teaching photography to the children of prostitutes. The resulting film, “Born into Brothels,” though not without controversy, offers a glimpse into the difficult lives of the kids who were finally given a medium and a voice to document their lives.

Bully (2012) – According to the Department of Education, 13 million children will be bullied this year. “Bully” profiles five of these victims, including Alex, a 12-year-old seventh grader at East Middle School in Sioux City, Iowa.

I Am Eleven (2012) – When it comes to surveying the “state of childhood,” there’s a few obvious, but very different paths. In “I Am Eleven,” Australian filmmaker Geneviève Bailey looks at a precise age, but spreads the subjects throughout 15 different countries, providing viewers a fascinating look into the minds of its subjects and a reminder that, no matter the country and circumstance, 11-year-olds are pretty great.

Babies (2010) – Thomas Balmès’ look at the early days of four different babies. Two of the featured babies are in rural areas (Namibia and Mongolia), the other two in urban locations (San Francisco and Tokyo), and Balmès foregoes any narration, letting the footage do the work.

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