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Source:  Master & Dynamic

Dutch sculptor Diederick Kraaijeveld has two important rules when it comes to his art. First, he only uses found wood; and second, he doesn’t use paint.

“I only use wood I find,” he tells us. And while he does cut the wood to fit it into his pieces, he doesn’t alter the color of it; if he needs a specific color of wood for his work, he goes out and finds it.  “And I like to use wood with a story—from special buildings, or from special places. I studied history, and sometimes you can feel the history in the piece of wood you’re working with. That’s what I love about the material.”

So what does Kraaijeveld make with all this wood?

“I create realistic mosaics; usually it’s two-dimensional photorealistic work. I started out with cars and household items and now I do a lot of portraits.”

But more recently Kraaijeveld took on a somewhat more ambitious project: creating a ten-foot-long, three-dimensional realistic sculpture of Manhattan—made out of wood from Manhattan’s water towers.

It took Kraaijeveld about five months to build the giant sculpture, working on it in his studio every single day. “At the beginning, I was a bit worried it would drive me crazy. I was starting in the south, in the Financial District, and that’s a bit of a mess, so to speak—not really straight lines. Then I got to the first street, and I knew I could build one or two streets a day. And I saw it growing every day, and that really made me happy. I really enjoyed working on it. Of course, I was happy when it was finally finished, but it wasn’t the burden I was expecting it to be, actually.”

Watch the mini-doc below and read the story at Master & Dynamic. 

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